Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-cf9d5c678-8r4lv Total loading time: 0.175 Render date: 2021-08-05T23:55:15.720Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

The 4D Future of Economic History: Digitally-Driven Data Design

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 December 2015

Kris James Mitchener
Affiliation:
Kris James Mitchener is Professor, Department of Economics, Leavey School of Business, Santa Clara University 500 El Camino Real, Santa Clara, CA 95053. E-mail: kmitchener@scu.edu.
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Image of the first page of this article. For PDF version, please use the ‘Save PDF’ preceeding this image.
Type
Essays—The Future of Economic History
Copyright
Copyright © The Economic History Association 2015 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Atack, Jeremy. “On the Use of Geographic Information Systems in Economic History: The American Transportation Revolution Revisited.” Journal of Economic History 73, no. 2 (2013): 313–38.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cummins, Neil, Kelly, Morgan, and Gráda, Cormac Ó. “Living Standards and Plague in London, 1560–1665.” Economic History Review, 2015. doi: 10.1111/ehr.12098.Google Scholar
Davison, Lee K., Ramirez, and, Carlos, D.Local Banking Panics of the 1920s: Identification and Determinants.” Journal of Monetary Economics 66 (September, 2014): 164177.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Donaldson, Dave and Hornbeck, Richard. “Railroads and American Economic Growth: A ‘Market Access' Approach.” Working Paper. January 2015.Google Scholar
Feigenbaum, James. “Automated Census Record Linking: A Machine Learning Approach.” Development of the American Economy, NBER presentation. Cambridge, MA, July 2015.Google Scholar
Friedman, Milton and Schwartz, Anna. Monetary History of the United States. Princeton University Press, 1963.Google Scholar
Grief, Avner. “Cliometrics after Forty Years.” American Economic Review, Papers & Proceedings 87, no. 2 (1997): 4003.Google Scholar
Gelman, Michael, Kariv, Shachar, Shapiro, Matthew D., et al. . “Harnessing Naturally Occurring Data to Measure the Response of Spending to Income.” Science 345, no. 6193 (2014): 21215.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hansen, Stephen, McMahon, Michael, and Prat, Andrea. “Transparency and Deliberation within the FOMC: A Computational Linguistics Approach.” Working Paper, 2015.Google Scholar
Jha, Saumitra, Mitchener, Kris James, and Takashima, Masanori. “Swords into Bank Shares: Finance, Conflict and Political Reform in Meiji Japan.” Working Paper, 2015.Google Scholar
Koenig, Christoph. “WWI Veterans and the Decline of Weimar Germany: Evidence on the Importance of Democracy's Early Days.” University of Warwick Dissertation Chapter, Coventry, U.K., 2015.Google Scholar
Mill, Roy. “Assessing Individual-Level Record Linkage between Historical Datasets.” Stanford University, Ph.D. Dissertation Chapter, Stanford, CA, 2012.Google Scholar
Mitchener, Kris James, and Richardson, Gary. “Contagion of Fear.” Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond Working Paper, Richmond, VA, 2015.Google Scholar
Temin, Peter. Did Monetary Forces Cause the Great Depression? New York: W.W. Norton & Company, 1976.Google Scholar
11
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

The 4D Future of Economic History: Digitally-Driven Data Design
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

The 4D Future of Economic History: Digitally-Driven Data Design
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

The 4D Future of Economic History: Digitally-Driven Data Design
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *