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Intrauterine growth restriction affects z-scores of anthropometric parameters during the first 6 years in very low-birth-weight-children born at less than 30 weeks of gestation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 June 2019

Hiromichi Shoji*
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatrics, Juntendo University Faculty of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421, Japan
Akiko Watanabe
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatrics, Juntendo University Urayasu Hospital, 2-1-1 Tomioka, Urayasu-shi, Chiba, 279-0021, Japan
Atsuko Awaji
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatrics, Juntendo University Urayasu Hospital, 2-1-1 Tomioka, Urayasu-shi, Chiba, 279-0021, Japan
Naho Ikeda
Affiliation:
Department of Neonatology, Juntendo University Shizuoka Hospital, 1129 Nagaoka, Izunokuni-shi, Shizuoka, 410-2295, Japan
Mariko Hosozawa
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatrics, Juntendo University Faculty of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421, Japan
Natsuki Ohkawa
Affiliation:
Department of Neonatology, Juntendo University Shizuoka Hospital, 1129 Nagaoka, Izunokuni-shi, Shizuoka, 410-2295, Japan
Naoto Nishizaki
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatrics, Juntendo University Urayasu Hospital, 2-1-1 Tomioka, Urayasu-shi, Chiba, 279-0021, Japan
Ken Hisata
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatrics, Juntendo University Faculty of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421, Japan
Masato Kantake
Affiliation:
Department of Neonatology, Juntendo University Shizuoka Hospital, 1129 Nagaoka, Izunokuni-shi, Shizuoka, 410-2295, Japan
Kaoru Obinata
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatrics, Juntendo University Urayasu Hospital, 2-1-1 Tomioka, Urayasu-shi, Chiba, 279-0021, Japan
Toshiaki Shimizu
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatrics, Juntendo University Faculty of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421, Japan
*
Address for correspondence: Hiromichi Shoji, Department of Pediatrics, Juntendo University Faculty of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421, Japan. Tel: +81-3-3813-3111; Fax: +81-3-5800-0216; Email: hshoji@juntendo.ac.jp

Abstract

Objective:

Little is known about physical constitution outcomes for very preterm infants. Here, we compare z-scores of anthropometric parameters up to 6 years of age in children born with very low birth weight (VLBW) at less than 30 weeks of gestation, with or without intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR).

Design:

Participants were divided into four subgroups: male (M), small for gestational age (SGA) (n = 30); M, appropriate for gestational age (AGA) (n = 59); female (F), SGA (n = 24); and F, AGA (n = 61). z-Scores of body weight (BW), body length (BL), and body mass index (BMI) were assessed at birth, 1 year corrected age, 3 years of age, and 6 years of age.

Results:

For boys, BW and BMI were significantly lower among SGA children than among AGA children at all assessments, but there was no difference in BL at 3 or 6 years. For girls, BW and BL were significantly lower among SGA children than among AGA children at all assessments, but no difference was detected in BMI after 1.5 years. No significant variation in the z-score of BW or BMI in either SGA group was observed after 1 year. BL z-score in all groups gradually increased until 6 years of age.

Conclusion:

IUGR affects BW and BMI in boys and BW and BL in girls during the first 6 years in VLBW children born at less than 30 weeks of gestation. SGA children did not catch up in BW or BMI from 1 to 6 years of age.

Type
Original Article
Copyright
© Cambridge University Press and the International Society for Developmental Origins of Health and Disease 2019 

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