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Cardiac and vascular disease prior to hatching in chick embryos incubated at high altitude

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 October 2009

C. E. Salinas
Affiliation:
Instituto Boliviano de Biología de Altura, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Mayor de San Andrés, La Paz, Bolivia
C. E. Blanco
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatrics, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands
M. Villena
Affiliation:
Instituto Boliviano de Biología de Altura, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Mayor de San Andrés, La Paz, Bolivia
E. J. Camm
Affiliation:
Department of Physiology, Development and Neuroscience, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
J. D. Tuckett
Affiliation:
Department of Physiology, Development and Neuroscience, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
R. A. Weerakkody
Affiliation:
Department of Physiology, Development and Neuroscience, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
A. D. Kane
Affiliation:
Department of Physiology, Development and Neuroscience, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
A. M. Shelley
Affiliation:
Department of Physiology, Development and Neuroscience, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
F. B. P. Wooding
Affiliation:
Department of Physiology, Development and Neuroscience, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
M. Quy
Affiliation:
Department of Physiology, Development and Neuroscience, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
D. A. Giussani
Affiliation:
Department of Physiology, Development and Neuroscience, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

The partial contributions of reductions in fetal nutrition and oxygenation to slow fetal growth and a developmental origin of cardiovascular disease remain unclear. By combining high altitude with the chick embryo model, we have previously isolated the direct effects of high-altitude hypoxia on growth. This study isolated the direct effects of high-altitude hypoxia on cardiovascular development. Fertilized eggs from sea-level or high-altitude hens were incubated at sea level or high altitude. Fertilized eggs from sea-level hens were also incubated at high altitude with oxygen supplementation. High altitude promoted embryonic growth restriction, cardiomegaly and aortic wall thickening, effects which could be prevented by incubating eggs from high-altitude hens at sea level or by incubating eggs from sea-level hens at high altitude with oxygen supplementation. Embryos from high-altitude hens showed reduced effects of altitude incubation on growth restriction but not on cardiovascular remodeling. The data show that: (1) high-altitude hypoxia promotes embryonic cardiac and vascular disease already evident prior to hatching and that this is associated with growth restriction; (2) the effects can be prevented by increased oxygenation; and (3) the effects are different in embryos from sea-level or high-altitude hens.

Type
Original Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press and the International Society for Developmental Origins of Health and Disease 2009

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