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Body adiposity and bone parameters of male rats from mothers fed diet containing flaxseed flour during lactation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 December 2015

C. A. S. da Costa
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Experimental Nutrition, Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Fluminense Federal University, Niterói, Brazil
P. C. A. da Silva
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Experimental Nutrition, Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Fluminense Federal University, Niterói, Brazil
D. C. Ribeiro
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Experimental Nutrition, Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Fluminense Federal University, Niterói, Brazil
A. D. D. Pereira
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Experimental Nutrition, Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Fluminense Federal University, Niterói, Brazil
A. d. S. d. Santos
Affiliation:
Physiological Sciences, Institute of Biology Roberto Alcantara Gomes, State University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
L. d. A. Maia
Affiliation:
Physiological Sciences, Institute of Biology Roberto Alcantara Gomes, State University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
L. D. G. Ruffoni
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Exercise Physiology, Federal University of São Carlos, São Paulo, Brazil
F. C. de Santana
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Lipids, Department of Food Science and Experimental Nutrition, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
M. D. C. de Abreu
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Experimental Nutrition, Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Fluminense Federal University, Niterói, Brazil
B. F. d. C. Boueri
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Experimental Nutrition, Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Fluminense Federal University, Niterói, Brazil
C. R. Pessanha
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Experimental Nutrition, Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Fluminense Federal University, Niterói, Brazil
K. O. Nonaka
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Exercise Physiology, Federal University of São Carlos, São Paulo, Brazil
J. Mancini-Filho
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Lipids, Department of Food Science and Experimental Nutrition, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
C. C. A. do Nascimento-Saba
Affiliation:
Physiological Sciences, Institute of Biology Roberto Alcantara Gomes, State University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
G. T. Boaventura
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Experimental Nutrition, Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Fluminense Federal University, Niterói, Brazil
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Obesity and osteoporosis may have their origins in early postnatal life. This study was designed to evaluate whether flaxseed flour use during lactation period bears effect on body adiposity and skeletal structure of male rat pups at weaning. At birth, male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to control and experimental (FF) groups, whose dams were treated with control or flaxseed flour diet, respectively, during lactation. At 21 days of age, pups were weaned to assess body mass, length and composition by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. The animals were then sacrificed to carry out analysis of serum profile, intra-abdominal adipocyte morphology and femur characteristics. Differences were considered significant when P<0.05. The FF group displayed the following characteristics (P<0.05): higher body mass, length, bone mineral content, bone area and concentrations of osteoprotegerin, osteocalcin and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol; higher levels of stearic, α-linolenic, eicosapentaenoic and docosapentaenoic acids and lower levels of arachidonic acid and cholesterol; smaller adipocyte area; and higher mass, epiphysis distance, diaphysis width, maximal load, break load, resilience and stiffness of femur. Flaxseed flour intake during lactation period promoted adipocyte hypertrophy down-regulation and contributed to pup bone quality at weaning.

Type
Original Article
Copyright
© Cambridge University Press and the International Society for Developmental Origins of Health and Disease 2015 

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