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Advantages of symphyseal distraction in the treatment of Brodie’s Syndrome

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 January 2014

Christine Sauvé*
Affiliation:
Doctorate of Dental Medicine,Master’s degree in Science, Fellow of the Royal College of Dentists of Canada
Thomas Wojcik
Affiliation:
MD
Joël Ferri
Affiliation:
MD, PhD
*
Address for correspondence: Christine Sauvé, CHU de Québec, Hôpital de l’Enfant Jésus, 1401, 18e rue, Québec (QC), Canada G1J 1Z4, chsauve1234@gmail.com
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Abstract

Orthodontists and maxillo-facial surgeons are very aware of the different therapeutic options for the correction of maxillary transverse deficiencies. But what about mandibular transverse deficiencies? A number of dentofacial orthopedic mandibular expansion techniques have been suggested, but they often have a tendency to relapse. Symphyseal distraction is the easiest solution for the correction of mandibular transverse defects, particularly in cases of a major deficiency such as Brodie’s Syndrome. In addition to recreating a physiologic occlusion, this technique makes it possible to considerably increase the width of the bony and soft tissue that not only improves the patient’s function and esthetics, but also helps to ensure long-term occlusal stability as well.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© RODF / EDP Sciences

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