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The relationship between the levels of free fatty acids, lipoprotein lipase, carboxylesterase, N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase, somatic cell count and other mastitis indices in bovine milk

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 June 2009

Carolyn H. Fitz-Gerald
Affiliation:
Otto Madsen Dairy Research Laboratory, Department of Primary Industries Hamilton, Queensland 4007, Australia
Hilton C. Deeth
Affiliation:
Otto Madsen Dairy Research Laboratory, Department of Primary Industries Hamilton, Queensland 4007, Australia
Barry J. Kitchen
Affiliation:
Otto Madsen Dairy Research Laboratory, Department of Primary Industries Hamilton, Queensland 4007, Australia

Summary

A large-scale survey of milks from healthy and mastitic bovine quarters was undertaken to establish the influence of mastitic infection on milk lipase activity and free fatty acid (FFA) level. Mastitic milks tended to have higher FFA levels, but lower lipoprotein lipase activities compared with milk from healthy quarters. These effects became significant at relatively severe levels of infection. The elevated FFA was attributable to higher FFA levels on secretion and to greater lipolysis during storage. Levels of carboxylesterase activity increased with severity of mastitis and showed high positive correlation with mastitis indices.

Marked increases in carboxylesterase, N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase and phospholipase occurred following the induction of mastitis by intramammary infusion of Escherichia, coli endotoxin, in parallel with changes in somatic cell count and other mastitis indices. Relatively little change in lipoprotein lipase activity was observed.

Type
Original Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Proprietors of Journal of Dairy Research 1981

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The relationship between the levels of free fatty acids, lipoprotein lipase, carboxylesterase, N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase, somatic cell count and other mastitis indices in bovine milk
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