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Effects of somatic cell count and stage of lactation on raw milk composition and the yield and quality of Cheddar cheese

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 June 2009

Martin J. Auldist
Affiliation:
School of Agriculture, La Trobe University, Bundoora VIC 3083, Australia
Stephen Coats
Affiliation:
Bonlac Foods Ltd, PO Box 4313, Melbourne, VIC 3001, Australia
Brian J. Sutherland
Affiliation:
CSIRO Division of Food Science and Technology, Highett, VIC 3190, Australia
Jeffery J. Mayes
Affiliation:
CSIRO Division of Food Science and Technology, Highett, VIC 3190, Australia
Graham H. McDowell
Affiliation:
School of Agriculture, La Trobe University, Bundoora VIC 3083, Australia
Graeme L. Rogers
Affiliation:
Bonlac Foods Ltd, PO Box 4313, Melbourne, VIC 3001, Australia

Summary

The effects of somatic cell count and stage of lactation on the yield and quality of Cheddar cheese were investigated. Cheese was manufactured in a pilotscale factory using milk of low bulk milk cell count (BMCC) from herds in early (LE) and late (LL) lactation, and milk of high BMCC from herds in early (HE) and late (HL) lactation. The deleterious effect of an elevated BMCC on product yield and quality in late lactation was clear. Cheese made from LL milk was significantly superior to that made from HL milk for most yield and quality characteristics measured. Stage of lactation also affected cheese yield and quality, as evidenced by the lower recovery of fat and poorer flavour score for cheese from LL milk compared with that manufactured from LE milk. The observed differences could be explained largely by differences in raw milk composition. We conclude that the effect of stage of lactation was magnified by an elevated BMCC, and that many of the problems encountered when processing late season milk could be overcome by containing mastitis at this time.

Type
Original Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Proprietors of Journal of Dairy Research 1996

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