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Comparative experiments of electrical conductivity from whey protein concentrates conventional film and nanofibril film

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 February 2020

Chen Guan
Affiliation:
Key Laboratory of Dairy Science, Ministry of Education, Northeast Agricultural University, Harbin150030, China College of Food Science, Heilongjiang Bayi Agricultural University, Daqing163319, China
XueFei He
Affiliation:
Key Laboratory of Dairy Science, Ministry of Education, Northeast Agricultural University, Harbin150030, China
HongHua Xu
Affiliation:
Key Laboratory of Dairy Science, Ministry of Education, Northeast Agricultural University, Harbin150030, China
MeiLi Shao
Affiliation:
Key Laboratory of Dairy Science, Ministry of Education, Northeast Agricultural University, Harbin150030, China
JinYu Ma
Affiliation:
Key Laboratory of Dairy Science, Ministry of Education, Northeast Agricultural University, Harbin150030, China
ZiWen Gao
Affiliation:
Key Laboratory of Dairy Science, Ministry of Education, Northeast Agricultural University, Harbin150030, China
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

We compared the electrical conductivity from two different aggregates of whey protein concentrates (WPC) film: conventional amorphous aggregation at natural pH (pH 6.5) and amyloid fibrils at a low pH (pH 2.0) far away from the isoelectric point. The two types of film fabricated by these solutions with different aggregate structures showed large variations in electrical conductivity and other properties. The WPC fibril film (pH 2.0) exhibited higher electrical conductivity than that of the conventional WPC film (pH 6.5), improved mechanical properties and oil resistance, due to varying morphology, higher surface hydrophobicity and more (absolute value) surface charge of film-forming solutions. The evidence from this study suggests that fibrilized WPC with high-ordered and β-sheets-rich structures fabricated high electrical conductivity film, which broadens the potential application of fibrils as functional bio-nanomaterials.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Hannah Dairy Research Foundation 2020

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