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Cholesterol oxidation in butter and dairy spread during storage

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 June 2009

Jacob H. Nielsen
Affiliation:
KVL Centre for Food Research, Department of Dairy and Food Science and Chemistry Department, Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Thorvaldsensvej 40, DK-1871 Frederiksberg C, Denmark
Carl Erik Olsen
Affiliation:
KVL Centre for Food Research, Department of Dairy and Food Science and Chemistry Department, Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Thorvaldsensvej 40, DK-1871 Frederiksberg C, Denmark
Claus Jensen
Affiliation:
KVL Centre for Food Research, Department of Dairy and Food Science and Chemistry Department, Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Thorvaldsensvej 40, DK-1871 Frederiksberg C, Denmark
Leif H. Skibsted
Affiliation:
KVL Centre for Food Research, Department of Dairy and Food Science and Chemistry Department, Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Thorvaldsensvej 40, DK-1871 Frederiksberg C, Denmark

Summary

In a dairy spread (800 g lipid/kg, 10 g salt/kg) based on 750 g milk fat/kg and 250 g rapeseed oil/kg fat in 15 g extruded catering packaging, there was a more significant accumulation of cholesterol oxidation products than in butter (minimum 800 g lipid/kg, 12 g salt/kg) in 10 g extruded catering packaging when stored at 4 or at 20 °C. There was a lag phase of 7 weeks in cholesterol oxidation in dairy spread stored at 4 °C, while no lag phase was observed for storage at 20 °C. Total concentrations of oxysterols were, however, very similar for dairy spread stored at 4 and 20 °C after 13 weeks storage (∼ 12 μg/g milk lipid); storage at – 18 °C almost prevented cholesterol oxidation (∼ 4 μg/g milk lipid). For butter, cholesterol oxidation was less pronounced at 4 °C (< 3 μg/g milk lipid) than at – 18 °C (∼ 4 μg/g milk lipid) and 20 °C (∼ 7 μg/g milk lipid). 7-Ketocholesterol was the dominant oxidation product, with 1·3 and 5·7 μg/g milk lipid in butter and dairy spread respectively after 13 weeks storage at 4 °C.

Type
Original Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Proprietors of Journal of Dairy Research 1996

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References

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