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Changes in the concentration of metabolites in milk from cows fed on diets supplemented with soyabean oil or fatty acids

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 June 2009

Anne Faulkner
Affiliation:
Hannah Research Institute, Ayr KA6 5HL, UK
Helen T. Pollock
Affiliation:
Hannah Research Institute, Ayr KA6 5HL, UK

Summary

Cows were fed on diets supplemented with soyabean oil or soyabean fatty acids which in some cases were protected from rumen hydrogenation. The fat-containing diets reduced the output of short- and medium-chain fatty acids in milk. Associated with this fall in short- and medium-chain fatty acids was a decrease in the concentration of 2-oxoglutarate and an increase in that of isocitrate and citrate. Protection of polyunsaturated fat from rumen hydrogenation had no significant effect. Milk yields were unaffected by diet, but the variation in milk yield among cows correlated positively with the concentration of glucose in milk.

Type
Original Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Proprietors of Journal of Dairy Research 1989

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References

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