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4457 Adopting a Team Science Communication Module for Community-Partnered Teams

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 July 2020

Arleen F Brown
Affiliation:
UCLA Division of General Internal Medicine
Keith Norris
Affiliation:
UCLA Division of General Internal Medicine
Rachelle Bross
Affiliation:
The Lundquist Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center
Yelba Castellon
Affiliation:
UCLA Division of General Internal Medicine
Norma Mtume
Affiliation:
UCLA Division of General Internal Medicine
D’Ann Morris
Affiliation:
UCLA General Internal Medicine
Aziza Lucas Wright
Affiliation:
Charles Drew University
Juan Barron
Affiliation:
UCLA General Internal Medicine
Sarmen Hakopian
Affiliation:
UCLA General Internal Medicine
Maritza Salazar Campo
Affiliation:
University of California, Irvine
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Abstract

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OBJECTIVES/GOALS: There is increased recognition that patients and community members are critical to creating impactful research. To this end the UCLA CTSI Community Engagement & Research Program modified an established multidisciplinary team science communication module to train academic-community research teams. METHODS/STUDY POPULATION: Community partners who have had previous experience in participatory research provided input such as limiting the emphases of individual academic introductions to group icebreakers (to level the playing field), reduced academic jargon to lay language, reducing the amount of text to key principles, and changed academic team scenarios for the team activity to represent community-academic teams. Academic partners articulated institutional barriers to integrating community into institutional systems. Iterative testing and modifications occurred through pilots with eleven teams (49 individuals). RESULTS/ANTICIPATED RESULTS: Embedding community partners in team science training involved creating a level playing field with less emphasis on academic credentials, using lay language in the didactic sessions and ensuring accessibility in all aspects of the training. An example of modifications: communication scenarios were read out loud by participants, which community partners felt were not inclusive of potential varying literacy levels and all partners may not feel comfortable reading aloud in a group setting. The vignettes were replaced with short videos of the scenarios with audio recordings. Several modifications were made the training’s team activity of the training module. DISCUSSION/SIGNIFICANCE OF IMPACT: Traditional academic team science training required significant modifications for an academic/community-partnered team to allow for optimal collaboration, inclusion, and strategically reduce the power dynamics that can naturally occur. Long-term followup to assess their effectiveness is needed.

Type
Health Equity & Community Engagement
Creative Commons
Creative Common License - CCCreative Common License - BY
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Copyright
© The Association for Clinical and Translational Science 2020