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4199 A pilot randomized controlled trial of precision care for smoking cessation in the Southern Community Cohort Study

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 July 2020

Nicole Senft
Affiliation:
Vanderbilt University Medical Center
Maureen Sanderson
Affiliation:
Meharry Medical College
Rebecca Selove
Affiliation:
Tennessee State University
William J. Blot
Affiliation:
Vanderbilt University Medical Center
Rachel F. Tyndale
Affiliation:
University of Toronto
Quiyin Cai
Affiliation:
Vanderbilt University Medical Center
Karen Gilliam
Affiliation:
Vanderbilt University Medical Center
Suman Kundu
Affiliation:
Vanderbilt University Medical Center
Hilary A. Tindle
Affiliation:
Vanderbilt University Medical Center
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Abstract

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OBJECTIVES/GOALS: Precision care may engage smokers and providers in treatment but is understudied in the community. We piloted guideline-based care (GBC) alone or with Respiragene, a lung cancer polygenic risk score (PRS, 1-10), or metabolism-informed choice of medication using the nicotine metabolite ratio (NMR). METHODS/STUDY POPULATION: Daily smokers (n = 58) with stored biospecimens in the Southern Community Cohort Study were randomized 1:1:1 to GBC, PRS, or NMR, counseled to quit smoking, and co-selected FDA-approved cessation medication (nicotine replacement, varenicline) with a tobacco counselor. In PRS, precision motivational counseling was guided by PRS (i.e., lung cancer risk 10-40-fold that of never-smokers). In NMR, precision medication recommendations consisted of varenicline for faster metabolizers (NMR≥0.31) and nicotine replacement for slow metabolizers (NMR<0.31). Feasibility was defined as achieving at least 50% provider engagement (med prescription) and at least 50% patient engagement (self-reported med use). RESULTS/ANTICIPATED RESULTS: Participants were median age 59, 72% female, 81% Black, 60% with incomes <$15,000; median cigarettes/day was 15 (IQR 8-20) and 52% reported time-to-first cigarette <5 minutes, illustrating moderate nicotine dependence. Providers confirmed medication prescriptions for 40% of patients (32% GBC, 50% PRS, 37% NMR) and 83% of patients reported using medication (prescribed or unprescribed) during the study (90% GBC, 80% PRS, 79% NMR). At 6-month follow-up, 27% (n = 15) reported cessation (39% GBC, 16% PRS, 26% NMR). Among persistent smokers, 46% reported smoking at least 50% fewer cigarettes/day compared to baseline (45% GBC, 38% PRS, 57% NMR). Small sample size precluded statistical comparisons. DISCUSSION/SIGNIFICANCE OF IMPACT: Precision interventions to quit smoking are feasible for community smokers, who engaged at high rates. However, only 40% of providers supported patients’ quit attempts with medication prescriptions. Future research should test strategies to raise provider engagement in precision smoking treatment. CONFLICT OF INTEREST DESCRIPTION: R.F.T. has consulted for Quinn Emmanual and Apotex on unrelated topics. H.A.T. reported providing input on design for a phase 3 trial of cytisine proposed by Achieve Life Sciences and being a principal investigator of National Institutes of Health–sponsored studies for smoking cessation that include medications donated by the manufacturers. Other authors declare no potential conflicts of interest.

Type
Precision Medicine
Creative Commons
Creative Common License - CCCreative Common License - BY
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Copyright
© The Association for Clinical and Translational Science 2020