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137 Patient perceptions of nonpharmacological pain treatment in the emergency department setting

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 April 2023

Rogelio Coronado
Affiliation:
Vanderbilt University Medical Center
Kristin R. Archer
Affiliation:
Vanderbilt University Medical Center
Tyler Toledo
Affiliation:
Vanderbilt University Medical Center
Carrie E. Brintz
Affiliation:
Vanderbilt University Medical Center
Kimberlee Bonnett
Affiliation:
Vanderbilt University
David G. Schlundt
Affiliation:
Vanderbilt University
Catherine Hobbs
Affiliation:
Vanderbilt University Medical Center
Mira Patel
Affiliation:
Vanderbilt University Medical Center
Alan B. Storrow
Affiliation:
Vanderbilt University Medical Center
Sean P. Collins
Affiliation:
Vanderbilt University Medical Center
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Abstract

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OBJECTIVES/GOALS: This study examined patient perceptions on the benefits, barriers, and facilitators of conventional and complementary/behavioral pain strategies that can be offered in the ED setting including physical therapy, mindfulness, acupuncture, and yoga. METHODS/STUDY POPULATION: We conducted and recorded semi-structured interviews with 30 patients who presented to the ED with musculoskeletal pain. Interviews focused on patients’ perceptions of NP pain treatments, barriers/facilitators to utilization, and recommendations that would promote engagement. A hierarchical coding system was developed and refined using the interview guide, the Theory of Planned Behavior, and preliminary review of the transcripts. The iterative process of developing the coding system allowed us to identify preliminary themes. RESULTS/ANTICIPATED RESULTS: Patients believe education on pain and the mind-body connection would give a sense of pain control. Likely barriers to engaging at the ED include lights, noise, interruptions, and uncertainty of their medical status. Post-discharge NP treatment barriers are financial and logistical. Engagement can be facilitated by a desire to avoid opioids, familiarity with meditation practices, and consistent positive communication with the health care team. Patients desire evidence on effectiveness, including testimonials, and suggested NP techniques should be introduced early, with written materials used for post-discharge referral. Patients prefer in-person treatment but would appreciate a virtual option. The initial session should occur in-person to build trust and facilitate virtual session engagement. DISCUSSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Patients are willing to engage in nonpharmacological pain treatment, however the unpredictable ED environment, uncertainty of their medical status, and financial and time constraints are significant barriers.

Type
Evaluation
Creative Commons
Creative Common License - CCCreative Common License - BYCreative Common License - NCCreative Common License - ND
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2023. The Association for Clinical and Translational Science