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124 Enhancing Inclusion of Older Adults in Research: What do Older Adults Think?

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 April 2022

Meredith Zauflik
Affiliation:
Oregon Health & Science University
Kim Brown
Affiliation:
Oregon Health & Science University
Derrik Zebroski
Affiliation:
Oregon Health & Science University
Elizabeth Eckstrom
Affiliation:
Oregon Health & Science University
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Abstract

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OBJECTIVES/GOALS: Older adults are included in clinical research infrequently compared to their burden of chronic illness. The goal for this study is to learn from older adults about their lived experiences with research and use this knowledge to develop tools and solutions aimed at increasing their inclusion. METHODS/STUDY POPULATION: This study utilized the 5T Model (developed by Duke CTSA) and Community Engagement Studio (CES) (developed by Vanderbilt CTSA) to connect and engage with community experts (older adults and those who work with older adults) in Oregon. Two CES were completed with 14 community experts and 4 investigators interested in including older adults in their studies. Participants took part in a 2-hour facilitated discussion to gain insight from their perspectives on research. The 5T Model was shared with participants and used to guide the discussion and elicit feedback on the model and identify gaps in resources and training needed for investigators to enhance inclusion of older adults in research. RESULTS/ANTICIPATED RESULTS: Trust, relationships, education, and diversity were themes identified across all of the 5Ts. Participants discussed the need for inclusion and diversity within research, with an emphasis on those at the oldest ages, rural populations, and lower socioeconomic status. Participants acknowledged both investigators and participants require more education, with a great need for improving health literacy for research participants. Participants saw trust and relationships as an integral part of older adult inclusion in research, with the relationship being not only that between investigator and participant, but between them and the communities that support older adults, including family members. DISCUSSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This study highlighted the voices of older adult research participants, allowing for participant-informed findings and solution development. Future directions will focus on developing and refining tools and resources for investigators and expanding to other underrepresented populations.

Type
Community Engagement
Creative Commons
Creative Common License - CCCreative Common License - BYCreative Common License - NCCreative Common License - ND
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2022. The Association for Clinical and Translational Science
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