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Unruly People: Crime, Community, and State in Late Imperial South China. By Robert J Antony. Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press, 2016. 308 pp. $65.00, £50.00 (cloth).

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Unruly People: Crime, Community, and State in Late Imperial South China. By Robert J Antony. Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press, 2016. 308 pp. $65.00, £50.00 (cloth).

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 May 2018

Steven B. Miles*
Affiliation:
Washington University in Saint Louissmiles@wustl.edu

Abstract

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Type
Book Review
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2018 

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References

1 For example, Schierup, Carl-Ulrik, Munck, Ronaldo, Likić-Brborić, Branka, and Neergaard, Anders, eds., Migration, Precarity, and Global Governance: Challenges and Opportunities for Labour (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015)CrossRefGoogle Scholar. Precarity was a major theme explored at the conference “The Migration Industry: Facilitators and Brokerage in Asia” at the Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore, June 1–2, 2017.

2 Antony, , “Subcounty Officials, the State, and Local Communities in Guangdong Province, 1644–1860,” in Dragons, Tigers, and Dogs: Qing Crisis Management and the Boundaries of State Power in Late Imperial China, edited by Antony, Robert J. and Leonard, Jane Kate (Ithaca: East Asia Program, Cornell University, 2002), 2759Google Scholar.

3 Lee, James Z. and Feng, Wang, One Quarter of Humanity: Malthusian Mythology and Chinese Realities (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1999), 54, table 4.1Google Scholar.

4 Chung-li, Chang, The Chinese Gentry: Studies on Their Role in Nineteenth-Century Chinese Society (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1955), 114Google Scholar.

5 Macauley, , “Opium, Migrants, and the War on Drugs in China, 1819–1860,” Late Imperial China 30.1 (June 2009), 2, 14–15, 31Google Scholar.

6 Thilly, , “Opium and the Origins of Treason in Modern China: The View from Fujian,” Late Imperial China 38.1 (June 2017), 159–62, 168–70CrossRefGoogle Scholar.