Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-564cf476b6-pxp6n Total loading time: 0.198 Render date: 2021-06-18T22:17:48.910Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true }

Functional changes in early child language: the appearance of references to the past and of explanations*

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 September 2008

Edy Veneziano
Affiliation:
Université de Genève and Université de Nancy II
Hermina Sinclair
Affiliation:
Université de Genève

Abstract

Spontaneous speech samples from children during the period of transition from one word to multi-word utterances in interaction with their French-speaking mothers were explored in order to study the appearance and development of functional changes in their use of language. Two types of such change were noted in the longitudinal records of four children when they were still essentially one-word speakers: the beginnings of references to the past, and the appearance of explanations and justifications, especially in communicative situations of request and refusal. The co-appearance of these behaviours is discussed in relation to two more general developmental changes: a detachment from the immediately perceptible situation linked to a further elaboration of the signifier-signified relation, and a socio-cognitive development leading to a view of the interlocutor as an alter ego, as a person whose psychological states may be different from the child's own.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1995

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

Footnotes

[*]

The research reported in this paper was supported in part by the Fonds national suisse de la recherche scientifique (grants no. 11–30927.91 and no. 11–37304.93 to E. Veneziano and H. Sinclair).

References

Barbieri, M. S., Colavita, F. & Scheuer, N. (1990). The beginning of the explaining capacity. In Conti-Ramsden, G. & Snow, C. (eds), Children's language. Vol. 7. Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.Google Scholar
Bloom, L. (1970). Language development: form and function in emerging grammars. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.Google Scholar
Bloom, L. & Capatides, J. B. (1987). Source of meaning in the acquisition of complex syntax: the sample case of causality. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology 43, 112–28.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bloom, L., Lahey, M., Hood, L., Lifter, K. & Fiess, K. (1980). Complex sentences: acquisition of syntactic connectives and the semantic relations they encode. Journal of Child Language 7, 235–61.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bloomfield, L. (1935). Language. London: Allen & Unwin.Google Scholar
Bretherton, I., McNew, S. & Beeghly-Smith, M. (1981). Early person knowledge as expressed in gestural and verbal communication: when do infants acquire a ‘theory of mind’? In Lamb, M. E. & Sherrod, L. R. (eds), Infant social cognition. Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.Google Scholar
Brown, R. & Bellugi, U. (1964). Three processes in the child's acquisition of syntax. Harvard Educational Review 34, 133–51.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Butterworth, G., Harris, P., Leslie, A. & Wellman, H. (1991). Editorial Preface to the special issue ‘Perspectives on the child's theory of mind’. British Journal of Developmental Psychology 9, 14.Google Scholar
Clancy, P., Jacobsen, T. & Silva, M. (1976). The acquisition of conjunctions: a cross-linguistic study. Stanford Papers and Reports on Child Language Development 12, 7180.Google Scholar
Cohen, M. (1952/1969). Sur l'étude du langage enfantin. Enfance 3/4, 203–72.Google Scholar
Dunn, J. (1988). The beginnings of social understanding. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dunn, J. (1991). Understanding others: evidence from naturalistic studies of children. In Whiten, A. (ed.), Natural theories of mind. Oxford: Blackwell.Google Scholar
Eisenberg, A. R. (1985). Learning to describe past experiences in conversation. Discourse Processes 8, 177204.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ely, R. & McCabe, A. (1993). Remembered voices. Journal of Child Language 20, 671–96.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Greenfield, P. M. & Smith, M. (1976). The structure of communication in early language development. New York: Academic Press.Google Scholar
Harding, C. G. (1983). Setting the stage for language acquisition: communication development in the first year. In Golinkoff, R. M. (ed.), The transition from prelinguistic to linguistic communication: issues and implications. Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.Google Scholar
Hockett, C. F. (1958). A course in modern linguistics. New York: Macmillan.Google Scholar
Hood, L. & Bloom, L. (1979). What, when and how about why: a longitudinal study of early expressions of causality. Monograph of the Society for Research in Child Development 44 (6), Serial no. 181.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kagan, J. (1987). Introduction. In Kagan, J. & Lamb, S. (eds), The emergence of morality in young children. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
Lamb, S. (1991). Internal state words: their relation to moral development and to maternal communications about moral development in the second year of life. First Language 11, 391406.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lewis, M. M. (1936). Infant speech: a study of the beginnings of language. New York: Harcourt Brace.Google Scholar
Limber, J. (1973). The genesis of complex sentences. In Moore, T. E. (ed.), Cognitive development and the acquisition of language. London: Academic Press.Google Scholar
Lucariello, J. & Nelson, K. (1987). Remember and planning talk between mothers and children. Discourse Processes 10, 219–35.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lyons, J. (1977). Semantics. Vol. 1. Cambridge: C.U.P.Google Scholar
Miller, P. J. & Sperry, L. L. (1988). Early talk about the past: the origins of conversational stories of personal experience. Journal of Child Language 15, 293315.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Nelson, K. (1986). Event knowledge. Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.Google Scholar
Perner, J. & Wilde-Astington, J. (1992). The child's understanding of mental representation. In Beilin, H. & Pufall, P. B. (eds), Piaget's theory. Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.Google Scholar
Peterson, C. (1990). The who, when and where of early narratives. Journal of Child Language 17, 433–55.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Peterson, C. & McCabe, A. (1983). Developmental psycholinguistics: three ways of looking at a child's narrative. New York: Plenum Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Piaget, J. (1923). Le langage et la pensée chez l'enfant. Neuchâtel: Delachaux et Niestlé. (English translation (1959). The language and thought of the child. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul.)Google Scholar
Piaget, J. (1945). La formation du symbole chez l'enfant. Neuchâtel: Delachaux et Niestlé. (English translation (1962). Play, dreams and imitation in childhood. New York: Norton & Co.)Google Scholar
Reddy, V. (1991). Playing with others' expectations, teasing and mucking about in the first year. Whiten, A. (ed.), Natural theories of mind. Oxford: Blackwell.Google Scholar
Sachs, J. (1983). Talking about the there and then: the emergence of displaced reference in parent-child discourse. In Nelson, K. E. (ed.), Children's language. Vol. 4. Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.Google Scholar
Scollon, R. (1979). A real early stage: an unzippered condensation of a dissertation on child language. In Ochs, E. & Schieffelin, B. B. (eds), Developmental pragmatics. New York: Academic Press.Google Scholar
Snow, C. E. (1978). The conversational context of language acquisition. In Campbell, R. N. & Smith, P. T. (eds), Recent advances in the psychology of language: language development and mother-child interaction. New York: Plenum Press.Google Scholar
Veneziano, E. & Georgakopoulos, J. (1993). Is early mother-child discourse really tied to the hic et nune? Paper presented at the Sixth International Congress for the Study of Child Language. Trieste, Italy.Google Scholar
Vygotsky, L. S. (1933/1967). Play and its role in the mental development of the child. Soviet Psychology 5, 618.Google Scholar
46
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Functional changes in early child language: the appearance of references to the past and of explanations*
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Functional changes in early child language: the appearance of references to the past and of explanations*
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Functional changes in early child language: the appearance of references to the past and of explanations*
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *