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From one word to two words: repetition patterns on the way to structured speech*

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 February 2009

Edy Veneziano
Affiliation:
Université de Genève
Hermine Sinclair
Affiliation:
Université de Genève
Ioanna Berthoud
Affiliation:
Université de Genève

Abstract

This paper gives an account of the transition from one-word to multiword utterances based on the productions of one child from age 1;5.23 to 1;8.15 in spontaneous interaction with her mother. The authors' interpretation of the observed development emphasizes: (1) the initial dissociation and later co-ordination of temporal chaining of elements on the one hand and meaning-relatedness between elements on the other; and (2) the psychological importance of repetition patterns for the change from single-word functioning to meaning-related and temporally-chained multi-word utterances, i.e. utterances that show the duality of patterning characteristic of human language.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1990

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Footnotes

*

This research was supported by a grant from the Fonds National suisse de la Recherche Scientifique (FNRS) (No. 1. 168–0.85) to Hermine Sinclair and loanna Berthoud. We wish to express our thanks to the parents and children who participated in this study.

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