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Early language and nonverbal representation: a reassessment

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 September 2008

Edy Veneziano
Affiliation:
Université de Genève and Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Abstract

The relationship between language development and the development of non-verbal representation was studied longitudinally in six children. Language development is evaluated interactionally by considering not only the form and usage of a child's sounds but also the way a familiar person allows those sounds to function as instances of words belonging to the frequently revised language proper to the child–adult pair. Non-verbal representation, studied in a symbolic play situation, presents different behavioural levels, showing close synchrony with a large increase observed in language development. The results are taken as suggestive of an inter-relational hypothesis between language and non-verbal representation, and an interpretation in terms of reciprocal interaction is proposed.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1981

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