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Directionality preferences in the interpretation of anaphora: data from Korean and Japanese*

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 September 2008

William O'Grady
Affiliation:
University of Calgary
Yoshiko Suzuki-Wei
Affiliation:
University of Calgary
Sook Whan Cho
Affiliation:
University of Alberta

Abstract

Recent work by Lust and others has led to the prediction that children acquiring left-branching languages will exhibit a preference for backward patterns of anaphora. In this paper, we test this prediction against data from Korean and Japanese and show it to be false. An alternative hypothesis proposing a preference for forward patterns of anaphora is outlined and possible explanations for earlier experimental results supporting Lust's prediction are considered.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1986

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References

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Directionality preferences in the interpretation of anaphora: data from Korean and Japanese*
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