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DO SELF-REPORTED HEALTH INDICATORS PREDICT MORTALITY? EVIDENCE FROM MATLAB, BANGLADESH

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 August 2013

ABDUR RAZZAQUE
Affiliation:
International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh
A. H. M. G. MUSTAFA
Affiliation:
International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh
PETER KIM STREATFIELD
Affiliation:
International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Summary

In order to understand current and changing patterns of population health, there is a clear need for high-quality health indicators. The World Health Organization Study on Global AGEing and Adult Health (SAGE) survey platform and the International Network for the Demographic Evaluation of Populations and Their Health in developing countries (INDEPTH) generated data for this study. A total of 4300 people aged 50 years or older were selected randomly from the Matlab Health and Demographic Surveillance System of the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh. The health indicators derived from these survey data are self-rated general health, overall health state, quality of life and disability levels. The outcome of the study is mortality over a 2-year follow-up since the survey. Among the four health indicators, only self-rated health was significantly associated with subsequent mortality irrespective of sex: those who reported bad health had higher mortality than those who reported good health, even after controlling for socio-demographic factors. For all other three health indicators, such associations exist but are significant only for males, while for females it is significant only for ‘quality of life’.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2013 

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DO SELF-REPORTED HEALTH INDICATORS PREDICT MORTALITY? EVIDENCE FROM MATLAB, BANGLADESH
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