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Some properties of l-chloro-2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene linked glutathione S-transferase in dichlorvos resistant and susceptible strains of cotton aphid (Homoptera: Aphididae)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 March 2009

E. O. Owusu
Affiliation:
Department of Bioresources Science, Kochi University, B200 Monobe, Nankoku-shi, Kochi 783, Japan
M. Horiike
Affiliation:
Department of Bioresources Science, Kochi University, B200 Monobe, Nankoku-shi, Kochi 783, Japan

Summary

Effects of temperature, hydrogen ion and substrate concentrations on conjugation of l-chloro-2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene by glutathione S-transferase from susceptible and dichlorvos-resistant strains of cotton aphid (Aphis gossypii Glover (Homoptera: Aphididae)) were evaluated. Enzymes from both strains had common optimum temperature and substrate concentration values of 30 °C and 10 mM respectively. Also, while enzyme activity of the susceptible strain peaked at pH 7·2, that of the resistant strain showed complete linear dependency up to pH 8·0. Of four subcellular fractions, the 100 000 g supernatant (soluble fraction) gave the highest enzyme activity in both phosphate and Tris/HCl buffers. There was no linear relationship between insecticide application frequency and production of enzyme activity in the susceptible strain but there was a very high positive correlation between these two parameters in the resistant strain.

Type
Crops and Soils
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1996

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Some properties of l-chloro-2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene linked glutathione S-transferase in dichlorvos resistant and susceptible strains of cotton aphid (Homoptera: Aphididae)
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Some properties of l-chloro-2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene linked glutathione S-transferase in dichlorvos resistant and susceptible strains of cotton aphid (Homoptera: Aphididae)
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Some properties of l-chloro-2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene linked glutathione S-transferase in dichlorvos resistant and susceptible strains of cotton aphid (Homoptera: Aphididae)
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