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Relationships between a P-sorption index, extractable Fe and Al and fluoride reactivity in the soils of an area of mid-Wales

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 March 2009

P. J. Loveland
Affiliation:
Soil Survey of England and Wales, Rothamsted Experimental Station
P. S. Wright
Affiliation:
Soil Survey of England and Wales, Rothamsted Experimental Station
R. J. Dight
Affiliation:
Welsh Office, Trawsgoed, Dyfed, SF23 4HT

Summary

The soils of on area around Llangadog (mid-Wales) have been systematically sampled on a grid basis at 0–8 cm and 30–35 cm depths.

A P-sorption index was determined for these samples as were Fe and Al extractable by both 0·1 M K-pyrophosphate solution and 0·2 M-NH4-oxalate solution at pH 3. The reactivities of the soils with 1 M-NaF solution at pH 6·8 and pH 8 were also measured.

The results were stratified in terms of parent material, soil classification at subgroup level and soil series, and correlation coefficients calculated between the P-sorption index and the other variables (singly and in combination).

Only pyrophosphate-extractable Fe, i.e. ‘organically bound’, correlated reasonably well with the P-sorption index. However, the correlation was such that tolerably good estimates of P-sorption in an agronomic context could be made from pyrophosphate-extractable Fe values only for previously uncultivated brown podzolic soils (Manod series).

Fluoride reactivities at both pH values were poor predictors of P-sorption in these soils. Fluoride reactivity at pH 6·8 and oxalate-extractable Al, which have both been proposed as indices of the amounts of ‘poorly-ordered’ Al compounds in soils, failed to group these soils in similar ways. Doubt exists therefore as to whether these variables are measures of the same (or similar) property in these soils.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1983

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