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Influence of foliar applied chlormequat on radiation attenuation by winter barley canopies

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 March 2009

C. F. Green
Affiliation:
Department of Agriculture and Horticulture, University of Nottingham, School of Agriculture, Sutton Bonington, Loughborough, LE12 5RD
T. C. K. Dawkins
Affiliation:
Department of Agriculture and Horticulture, University of Nottingham, School of Agriculture, Sutton Bonington, Loughborough, LE12 5RD
B. Hunter
Affiliation:
Department of Agriculture and Horticulture, University of Nottingham, School of Agriculture, Sutton Bonington, Loughborough, LE12 5RD

Extract

Biomass production in barley is determined by the amount of solar radiation absorbed by the foliage (Gallagher & Biscoe, 1978). As incident irradiance per unit area varies little between neighbouring sites and seasons in the cereal growing areas of the U.K. (Monteith, 1978), biomass production will largely be governed by the size of the canopy, the orientation of canopy constituents and the efficiency of conversion of absorbed radiation into dry matter (Green, 1984). Reviewing the literature, Monteith & Elston (1983) have highlighted the constancy of mean seasonal efficiency, concluding that growth is limited by the ability of the stand to absorb radiation.

Type
Short Note
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1985

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References

REFERENCES

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