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A critical study of the hygroscopic coefficient of soil

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 March 2009

Amar Nath Puri
Affiliation:
Punjab Drainage Board Scholar. (Soil Physics Department, Rothamsted Experimental Station, Harpenden.)

Extract

With the aid of a careful technique a critical investigation has been made of the Hygroscopic Coefficient of soil at five temperatures, ranging from 15° C. to 35·6° C. It has been shown that (1) the customary 12–24 hours' period used by previous workers is much too short to give any approach to final values; (2) at the lower temperatures all except very light soils continue to take up water almost indefinitely, and it is not possible to extrapolate to an approximate final value; (3) these final values decrease with increasing temperature but in the early stages the rate of moisture absorption increases with increasing temperature; (4) the disputes as to whether the Hygroscopic Coefficient increased or decreased with temperature were due to the unrecognised operation of the effects detailed in (1) and (3) above.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1925

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References

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