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Comparative effectiveness of phosphate-enriched compost and single superphosphate on yield, uptake of nutrients and soil quality under soybean–wheat rotation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 October 2001

M. C. MANNA
Affiliation:
Indian Institute of Soil Science, Nabibagh, Berasia road, Bhopal 462038 M.P. India
P. K. GHOSH
Affiliation:
Indian Institute of Soil Science, Nabibagh, Berasia road, Bhopal 462038 M.P. India
B. N. GHOSH
Affiliation:
VPKAS, ICAR, Almora, U.P. India
K. N. SINGH
Affiliation:
Indian Institute of Soil Science, Nabibagh, Berasia road, Bhopal 462038 M.P. India

Abstract

Low organic matter concentration coupled with low native soil phosphorus (P) concentrations is a major constraint limiting the productivity of a soybean–wheat system on Vertisols in the Indian semi-arid tropics. In a 3-year field study (1996–99), the performance of four different composts obtained from legume straw (Glycine max Merr.L), cereal straw (Triticum aestivum), oilseed straw (Brassica juncea L.) and city rubbish were compared, and also with chemical fertilizers in terms of degree of maturity, quality of compost, improvement in soil organic matter, biological activities of soil and yields of soybean and wheat. Phospho-sulpho-nitrocomposts (phosphocomposts) were prepared containing approximately 2·5 to 4·2% P and 1·4 to 2·3% N, in an aerobic decomposition process for 4 months by adding an aqueous slurry of 1:1 (dry weight) cow dung, 2·2% P in the form of low grade Mussorie phosphate rock (7·5% P), 10% pyrite (S, 22·2%) and 0·5% urea N, and bioinoculums such as the cellulose decomposers Paecilomyces fusisporus and Aspergillus awamori, and P-solubilizing organisms i.e. Bacillus polymyxa and Pseudomonas striata. The maturity indexes were strongly associated with the source of materials, chemical composition and degree of decomposition. The matured composts had lower C/N ratios (8·2 to 21·7) and water soluble carbohydrates (0·23 to 0·43%) and larger ratios of cation exchange capacity/total organic carbon (CEC/TOC) and lignin/cellulose than the initial. The matured compost increased total P, water soluble P, citrate soluble P, total N and NO3-N and the application of phosphocompost at the rate of 10 t/ha gave plant growth dry matter accumulation, seed yield and P uptake by soybean equivalent to single superphosphate at 26·2 kg P/ha. The continuous turnover of enriched phosphocompost increased soil microbial biomass C and the activity of enzymes compared to application of chemical fertilizer.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© 2001 Cambridge University Press

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Comparative effectiveness of phosphate-enriched compost and single superphosphate on yield, uptake of nutrients and soil quality under soybean–wheat rotation
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