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Visitor Preferences and Values for Water-Based Recreation: A Case Study of the Ocala National Forest

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 April 2015

Ram K. Shrestha
Affiliation:
School of Forest Resources and Conservation, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
Janaki R.R. Alavalapati
Affiliation:
School of Forest Resources and Conservation, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
Taylor V. Stein
Affiliation:
School of Forest Resources and Conservation, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
Douglas R. Carter
Affiliation:
School of Forest Resources and Conservation, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
Christine B. Denny
Affiliation:
Pandion Systems, Inc., Gainesville, FL
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Abstract

We used the open-ended contingent valuation method to elicit willingness to pay (WTP) for day visitors and extended visitors on the Ocala National Forest (ONF), Florida. A Tobit model specification was applied to account for the issues involved with censored WTP bids. The results reveal that visitors would pay more for improved recreational facilities at the ONF. In particular, our estimates show that visitors would pay $1 million for basic facilities, $1.9 million for moderate improvements, and $2.5 million for more improvements.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Southern Agricultural Economics Association 2002

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