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Consumer Acceptance and Willingness to Pay for Blueberry Products with Nonconventional Attributes

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 January 2015

Wuyang Hu
Affiliation:
Department of Agricultural Economics, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY
Timothy Woods
Affiliation:
Department of Agricultural Economics, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY
Sandra Bastin
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition and Food Science, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY
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Abstract

Consumer acceptance and willingness to pay for three nonconventional attributes associated with six processed blueberry products was examined through an in-store conjoint experiment survey. Both credence and experience attributes were considered, including whether the products were produced locally, and whether they were organic or sugar-free. The results indicate heterogeneity in consumer preference and willingness to pay for different attributes across product categories. Local products and organic formulations generally received positive willingness to pay across all products. This information has implications for blueberry growers and retailers who are trying to create and position value-added products for maximum revenue.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Southern Agricultural Economics Association 2009

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