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Assessing Consumer Willingness to Pay for Value-Added Blueberry Products Using a Payment Card Survey

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 January 2015

Wuyang Hu
Affiliation:
Department of Agricultural Economics, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY
Timothy Woods
Affiliation:
Department of Agricultural Economics, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY
Sandra Bastin
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition and Food Science, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY
Linda Cox
Affiliation:
College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI
Wen You
Affiliation:
Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA
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Abstract

This study offers insights on consumer acceptance and willingness to pay for three value-added blueberry products. A modified payment card approach was used. The analytical framework adopted allows the researcher to attach straightforward economic interpretation to the estimated impacts of willingness to pay factors. Results show consumer socio-economic characteristics are important determinants but play different roles depending on the products. Information on health benefits may also be important. However, it is found that outside information or consumer self-stated awareness of blueberries' health benefits have different impacts. These impacts may function as substitutes rather than complements to each other.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Southern Agricultural Economics Association 2011

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