Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-n7x5d Total loading time: 0.581 Render date: 2021-12-01T20:04:05.391Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Deliberate self-harm: a comparison of first-time cases and cases with a prior history

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 June 2014

Kamal Gupta
Affiliation:
Maidstone Hospital, (Currently Senior Registrar, UMDS, Guy's and St Thomas's Hospitals and the South East Thames Regional Health Authority.)
Kandiah Sivakumar
Affiliation:
Maidstone Hospital, Psychiatric Wing, Hermitage Lane, Maidstone, Kent ME16 9QQ, England
Nigel Smeeton
Affiliation:
UMDS, Guy's Campus, Department of Public Health Medicine, London Bridge, London, SEI 9RT, England

Abstract

Objective: Eighty one patients admitted following deliberate self-harm were assessed using a semi-structured interview. The aim of the study was to compare clinical and social profiles of the 42 patients who had committed self harm for the first time with those of the 39 who had committed self harm in the past.

Method: The patients were assessed jointly by a psychiatrist and either a community psychiatric nurse or a social worker. A description of past suicidal behaviour, socio demographic information, medical and psychiatric history were recorded. Suicide intent was assessed both from the clinical interview and rated objectively using Pierce's suicide intent scale. Psychiatric diagnoses were made using the ICD 9 classification.

Results: The entire group had experienced difficulties in sustaining relationships. This problem was significantly more widespread in repeaters with increased use of physical violence in their relationship. More patients with a previous history claimed to have death wishes at the time of self harm, and asserted that they would harm themselves again compared with patients without a previous history. Clinical predictions regarding future self harming behaviour were in line with the patient's stated intentions.

Conclusion: The persistent desire to commit self harm and more widespread relational difficulties amongst the patients with a previous history suggests a need for different treatment strategies and outcome measures for the two groups.

Type
Original Papers
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1995

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

1.Diekstra, R. Suicide and attempted suicide: an international perspective. Acta Psychiatr Scand 1989; suppl 354: 124.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
2.Hawton, K, Fagg, J. Trends in deliberate self poisoning and self injury in Oxford. BMJ 1992; 304: 1409–11.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
3.Morgan, HG, Barton, J, Pottle, S, Pocock, H, Bums-Cox, CJ. Deliberate self-harm: a follow-up study of 279 patients. Br J Psychiatry 1976; 128: 361–8.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
4.Morgan, HG, Burns-Cox, CJ. Pocock, H, Pottle, S. Deliberate self-harm: clinical socio-economic characteristics of 368 patients. Br J Psychiatry 1975; 127: 564–74.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
5.Platt, S. Hawton, K, Kreitman, N, Fagg, J, Foster, J. Recent clinical and epidemiological trends in parasuicide in Edinburgh and Oxford: a tale of two refs. Psychol Med 1988; 18: 405–18.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
6.Bancroft, JHT, Skrimshire, AM, Casson, J, Harvard-Watts, O, Reynolds, F. People who deliberately poison or injure themselves: their problems and contacts with helping agencies. Psychol Med 1977; 7: 289303.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
7.Hawton, K. Assessment of suicide risk. Br J Psychiatry 1987; 150: 145–53.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
8.Kreitman, N. Casey, P. Repetition of parasuicide: an epidemiological and clinical study. Br J Psychiatry 1988; 153: 792800.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
9.Pierce, DW. Suicidal intent in self injury. Br J Psychiatry 1977; 130: 377–85.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
10. International Classification of Diseases 9th Edition. World Health Organisation. 1978.Google Scholar
11.Siegel, S. Nonparametric statistics for the behavioral sciences. McGraw-Hill Book Company: New York. 1956.Google Scholar
12.Platt, S, Kreitman, N. Trends in parasuicide and unemployment among males in Edinburgh, 1968-82. BMJ 1984; 289: 1029–32.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
13.Hawton, K. Rose, N. Unemployment and attempted suicide among men in Oxford. Health Trends 1986; 18: 2932.Google Scholar
14.Ojehagen, A, Regnill, G, Traskman-Bendz, L. Deliberate self-poisoning: repeaters and non-repeaters admitted to an intensive care unit. Acta Psychiatr Scand 1991; 84: 266–71.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
15.Welcher, B, Rubin, P. Nordentoft, M. Admission of self-poisoned patients during one year at the Poisoning Treatment Centre. Copenhagen, Denmark. Acta Psychiatr Scand 1993; Suppl 371: 3844.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
16.Bancroft, J, Hawton, K, Simpkin, S, Kingston, B, Cumming, C, Whitwell, D. The reasons people give for taking overdoses; a further enquiry. Br J Med Psychol 1979; 52: 353–65.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
17.Chowdhury, N, Hicks, RC, Kreitman, N. Evaluation of an after-care service for parasuicide (attempted suicide) patients. Soc Psychiatry 1973; 8: 6781.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
18.Linter, CM. Psychiatric involvement in cases of deliberate self-harm. Br J Clin Soc Psychiatry 1985; 3: 1115.Google Scholar
19.Patel, AR. Attitudes towards self poisoning. BMJ 1975; 2: 426–30.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
2
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Deliberate self-harm: a comparison of first-time cases and cases with a prior history
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Deliberate self-harm: a comparison of first-time cases and cases with a prior history
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Deliberate self-harm: a comparison of first-time cases and cases with a prior history
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *