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Interactional international law: an introduction

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 June 2011

Jutta Brunnée*
Affiliation:
Metcalf Chair in Environmental Law, Faculty of Law, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Stephen J. Toope
Affiliation:
President and Vice Chancellor, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

Abstract

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Type
Symposium on Legitimacy and Legality in International Law: An Interactional Account by Jutta Brunnée and Stephen J. Toope
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2011

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Footnotes

*

Metcalf Chair in Environmental Law, Faculty of Law, University of Toronto; and President and Vice-Chancellor, University of British Columbia, respectively.

References

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