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FC1: Effect of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) on Left Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex (DLPFC) in Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 February 2024

Carol Sheei-Meei Wang
Affiliation:
Department of BioMedical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan City, Taiwan Department of Psychiatry, Tainan Hospital, Ministry of Health and Welfare, Tainan City, Taiwan Department of Psychiatry, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, Tainan City, Taiwan
Kuo-Sheng Cheng
Affiliation:
Department of BioMedical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan City, Taiwan
Chia-Hung Tang
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Tainan Hospital, Ministry of Health and Welfare, Tainan City, Taiwan
Nien-Tsen Hou
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, Tainan Hospital, Ministry of Health and Welfare, Tainan City, Taiwan
Pei-Fang Chien
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Tainan Hospital, Ministry of Health and Welfare, Tainan City, Taiwan
Ying-Che Huang
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, Tainan Hospital, Ministry of Health and Welfare, Tainan City, Taiwan
Pai-Lien Chen
Affiliation:
Department of Biostatistics and Data Science, FHI 360, Durham, NC, USA
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Abstract

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Introduction:

tDCS application to the DLPFC is associated with the improvements of executive function, memory enhancement, language, processing speed, global cognitive symptoms and apathy over time after treatment. DLB is the second most common form of degenerative dementia. There is no FDA-approved medications that can slow, stop or improve the progression of cognitive declines in DLB. Identifying effective treatments is a critical issue for DLB. In neuropathology, extracelluar α-syn oligomers interfere with the expression of long-term potentiation(LTP), and influence memory and learning. tDCS has been proposed to affect long-term synaptic plasticity through LTP and long-term depression, thereby improving cognitive ability. So far, only two studies have evaluated the effect of tDCS in DLB. In this pilot study, we investigate the effect of tDCS on left DLPFC in DLB.

Method:

Fourteen DLB aged 55-90 years (mean age 76.4, with 4 males and 10 females) were included in a double-blind, randomized, sham-controlled cross over design study. DLB diagnostics is according to DSM-5 criteria. CDR ratings for DLB participants ranged from 0.5 to 2. The active tDCS (or sham) process consists of daily sessions of active tDCS (or sham) for 10 consecutive days. The anodal electrode was placed over the left DLPFC and the cathodal electrode was placed over the right supraorbital area, with a current intensity of 2 mA and an electrode size of 25 cm2 for 30 min in a session. Before and after these treatment sessions, all subjects received a series of neuropsychological tests, including CDR, MMSE, CASI, NPI and WCST. Chi-square test, Wilcoxon signed ranks test and Mann-Whitney U test were used to assess differences in participant demographic characteristics and to compare differences among groups.

Results:

The active tDCS group showed significant improvements on the three items of CASI, ‘language ability’, ‘concentration and calculation’, ‘categorical verbal fluency’, after active stimulations. There is no improvement in MMSE, CASI, NPI and WCST scores in the sham groups.

Conclusion:

These results suggest that left DLPFC anodal, and right deltoid cathodal tDCS, may have some cognitive benefits in DLB. Larger-scale trials are needed to confirm the effect of tDCS in DLB.

Key words: Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation, Dementia with Lewy Bodies, cognitive function, Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, left DLPFC

Type
Free/Oral Communications
Copyright
© International Psychogeriatric Association 2024