Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-747cfc64b6-hfbn9 Total loading time: 0.226 Render date: 2021-06-16T14:14:41.830Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true }

Late-life sleep duration associated with amnestic mild cognitive impairment

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 May 2021

Mengya Yuan
Affiliation:
Department of Geriatric Psychiatry, Shanghai Mental Health Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine and Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Disorders Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China
Bo Hong
Affiliation:
Department of Geriatric Psychiatry, Shanghai Mental Health Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine and Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Disorders Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China
Wei Zhang
Affiliation:
Department of Geriatric Psychiatry, Shanghai Mental Health Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine and Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Disorders Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China
An Liu
Affiliation:
Department of Geriatric Psychiatry, Shanghai Mental Health Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine and Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Disorders Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China
Jinghua Wang
Affiliation:
Department of Geriatric Psychiatry, Shanghai Mental Health Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine and Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Disorders Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China
Yuanyuan Liu
Affiliation:
Department of Geriatric Psychiatry, Shanghai Mental Health Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine and Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Disorders Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China
Feng Yan
Affiliation:
Department of Geriatric Psychiatry, Shanghai Mental Health Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine and Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Disorders Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China
Shifu Xiao
Affiliation:
Department of Geriatric Psychiatry, Shanghai Mental Health Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine and Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Disorders Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China
Hua Xu
Affiliation:
Department of Geriatric Psychiatry, Shanghai Mental Health Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine and Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Disorders Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China
Tao Wang
Affiliation:
Department of Geriatric Psychiatry, Shanghai Mental Health Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine and Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Disorders Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China
Corresponding

Abstract

Objective:

To examine the association between sleep duration in different stages of life and amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI).

Design, setting, and participants:

A total of 2472 healthy elderly and 505 patients with aMCI in China were included in this study. The study analyzed the association between aMCI and sleep duration in different stages of life.

Measurements:

We compared sleep duration in different stages of life and analyzed the association between Montreal Cognitive Assessment scores and sleep duration by curve estimation. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between aMCI and sleep duration.

Results:

In the analysis, there were no results proving that sleep duration in youth (P = 0.719, sleep duration < 10 hours; P = 0.999, sleep duration ≥ 10 hours) or midlife (P = 0.898, sleep duration < 9 hours; P = 0.504, sleep duration ≥ 9 hours) had a significant association with aMCI. In the group sleeping less than 7 hours in late life, each hour more of sleep duration was associated with approximately 0.80 of the original risk of aMCI (P = 0.011, odds ratio = 0.80, 95% confidence interval = 0.68–0.95).

Conclusions:

Among the elderly sleeping less than 7 hours, there is a decreased risk of aMCI for every additional hour of sleep.

Type
Original Research Article
Copyright
© International Psychogeriatric Association 2021

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

Footnotes

Contributed equally.

References

Abell, J. G., Shipley, M. J., Ferrie, J. E., Kivimäki, M. and Kumari, M. (2016). Recurrent short sleep, chronic insomnia symptoms and salivary cortisol: a 10-year follow-up in the Whitehall II study. Psychoneuroendocrinology, 68, 91–99. doi:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.psyneuen.2016.02.021. CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Adam, K. (1980). Sleep as a Restorative Process and a Theory to Explain Why. In: McConnell, P. S., Boer, G. J., Romijn, H. J., Van De Poll, N. E. and Corner, M. A. (Eds.), Progress in Brain Research (pp 289305). Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Elsevier.Google Scholar
Alperin, N., et al. (2019). Effect of sleep quality on amnestic mild cognitive impairment vulnerable brain regions in cognitively normal elderly individuals. Sleep, 42. doi: 10.1093/sleep/zsy254.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Anderson, R. M., Hadjichrysanthou, C., Evans, S. and Wong, M. M. (2017). Why do so many clinical trials of therapies for Alzheimer’s disease fail? Lancet, 390, 23272329. doi: 10.1016/s0140-6736(17)32399-1.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Benito-León, J., Louis, E. D. and Bermejo-Pareja, F. (2013). Cognitive decline in short and long sleepers: a prospective population-based study (NEDICES). Journal of Psychiatric Research, 47, 19982003. doi: 10.1016/j.jpsychires.2013.09.007.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bliwise, D. L. (1993). Sleep in normal aging and dementia. Sleep, 16, 4081. doi: 10.1093/sleep/16.1.40.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Brown, B. M., Peiffer, J. J. and Martins, R. N. (2013). Multiple effects of physical activity on molecular and cognitive signs of brain aging: can exercise slow neurodegeneration and delay Alzheimer’s disease? Molecular Psychiatry, 18, 864874. doi: 10.1038/mp.2012.162.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Caamaño-Isorna, F., Corral, M., Montes-Martínez, A. and Takkouche, B. (2006). Education and dementia: a meta-analytic study. Neuroepidemiology, 26, 226232. doi: 10.1159/000093378.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Campbell, N. L., Unverzagt, F., Lamantia, M. A., Khan, B. A. and Boustani, M. A. (2013). Risk factors for the progression of mild cognitive impairment to dementia. Clinics in Geriatric Medicine, 29, 873.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Chen, J. C. et al. (2016). Sleep duration, cognitive decline, and dementia risk in older women. Alzheimers & Dementia, 12, 2133. doi: 10.1016/j.jalz.2015.03.004.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Chen, Y. et al. (2021). Metformin attenuates plaque-associated tau pathology and reduces amyloid-β burden in APP/PS1 mice. Alzheimer’s Research & Therapy, 13, 40. doi: 10.1186/s13195-020-00761-9.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Choi, S. H. et al. (2014). A three-dimensional human neural cell culture model of Alzheimer’s disease. Nature, 515, 274278. doi: 10.1038/nature13800.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Chung, J.-Y. et al. (2019). Reversion from mild cognitive impairment to normal cognition: false-positive error or true restoration thanks to cognitive control ability? Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, 15, 30213032. doi: 10.2147/NDT.S223958.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Crous-Bou, M., Minguillón, C., Gramunt, N. and Molinuevo, J. L. (2017). Alzheimer’s disease prevention: from risk factors to early intervention. Alzheimer’s Research & Therapy, 9, 71–71. doi: 10.1186/s13195-017-0297-z.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ding, G., Li, J. and Lian, Z. (2020). Both short and long sleep durations are associated with cognitive impairment among community-dwelling Chinese older adults. Medicine, 99, e19667.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Foundation, N. S. (2018). National Sleep Foundation Recommends New Sleep Times. Available at: http://sleepfoundation.org/press-release/national-sleep-foundation-recommends-new-sleep-times/page/0/1 Google Scholar
Gil, L., Vega, J. G., Ruiz de Sanchez, C. and Burgos, F. P. (2013). Validation of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment – Spanish Version test (MoCA-S) as a screening tool for mild cognitive impairment and mild dementia in Bogotá, Colombia. Alzheimer’s & Dementia, 9, P452P453. doi:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jalz.2013.05.904.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Guarnieri, B. et al. (2012). Prevalence of sleep disturbances in mild cognitive impairment and dementing disorders: a multicenter Italian clinical cross-sectional study on 431 patients. Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders, 33, 5058. doi: 10.1159/000335363.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Guarnieri, B. and Sorbi, S. (2015). Sleep and cognitive decline: a strong bidirectional relationship. It is time for specific recommendations on routine assessment and the management of sleep disorders in patients with mild cognitive impairment and dementia. European Neurology, 74, 4348. doi: 10.1159/000434629.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Intlekofer, K. A. and Cotman, C. W. (2013). Exercise counteracts declining hippocampal function in aging and Alzheimer’s disease. Neurobiology of Disease, 57, 4755. doi: 10.1016/j.nbd.2012.06.011.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Irwin, M. R. and Vitiello, M. V. (2019). Implications of sleep disturbance and inflammation for Alzheimer’s disease dementia. The Lancet Neurology, 18, 296306. doi: 10.1016/S1474-4422(18)30450-2.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Jablonski, A. M. et al. (2021). Astrocytic expression of the Alzheimer’s disease risk allele, ApoEϵ4, potentiates neuronal tau pathology in multiple preclinical models. Scientific Reports, 11, 3438. doi: 10.1038/s41598-021-82901-1.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kakutani, S., Watanabe, H. and Murayama, N. (2019). Green tea intake and risks for dementia, Alzheimer’s disease, mild cognitive impairment, and cognitive impairment: a systematic review. Nutrients, 11, 1165. doi: 10.3390/nu11051165.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kang, J.-E. et al. (2009). Amyloid-beta dynamics are regulated by orexin and the sleep-wake cycle. Science (New York, N.Y.), 326, 10051007. doi: 10.1126/science.1180962.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kasper, S. et al. (2020). Management of mild cognitive impairment (MCI): the need for national and international guidelines. The World Journal of Biological Psychiatry, 21, 579594. doi: 10.1080/15622975.2019.1696473.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kim, C. E. et al. (2018). Association between sleep duration and metabolic syndrome: a cross-sectional study. BMC Public Health, 18, 720. doi: 10.1186/s12889-018-5557-8.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kincheski, G. C. et al. (2017). Chronic sleep restriction promotes brain inflammation and synapse loss, and potentiates memory impairment induced by amyloid-β oligomers in mice. Brain, Behavior, and Immunity, 64, 140151. doi:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bbi.2017.04.007.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kwok, C. S. et al. (2018). Self-reported sleep duration and quality and cardiovascular disease and mortality: a dose-response meta-analysis. Journal of the American Heart Association, 7, e008552e008552. doi: 10.1161/JAHA.118.008552.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lin, X. et al. (2016). Screening for depression and anxiety among older Chinese immigrants living in Western countries: the use of the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) and the Geriatric Anxiety Inventory (GAI). Asia-Pacific Psychiatry, 8.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lin, Y.-S., Tsai, Y.-J., Tsay, J.-S. and Lin, J.-K. (2003). Factors affecting the levels of Tea Polyphenols and Caffeine in Tea Leaves. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 51, 18641873. doi: 10.1021/jf021066b.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Liu, S. et al. (2020). Sleep spindles, K-complexes, limb movements and sleep stage proportions may be biomarkers for amnestic mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease. Sleep and Breathing, 24, 637651. doi: 10.1007/s11325-019-01970-9.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Mesas, A. E. et al. (2014). Sleep quality and the metabolic syndrome: the role of sleep duration and lifestyle. Diabetes/Metabolism Research and Reviews, 30, 222231. doi:https://doi.org/10.1002/dmrr.2480.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Moroney, J. T., Bagiella, E., Desmond, D. W., Hachinski, V. C. and Tatemichi, T. K. (1997). Meta-analysis of the Hachinski Ischemic Score in pathologically verified dementias. Neurology, 49, 1096.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Morris, J. C. et al. (2001). Mild cognitive impairment represents early-stage Alzheimer disease. Archives of Neurology, 58, 397405. doi: 10.1001/archneur.58.3.397.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
O’Bryant, S. E. et al. (2008). Detecting dementia with the mini-mental state examination in highly educated individuals. Archives of Neurology, 65, 963967. doi: 10.1001/archneur.65.7.963.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ohayon, M. M. and Vecchierini, M. F. (2002). Daytime sleepiness and cognitive impairment in the elderly population. Archives of Internal Medicine, 162, 201208. doi: 10.1001/archinte.162.2.201.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Pace-Schott, E. F. and Spencer, R. M. C. (2015). Sleep-Dependent Memory Consolidation in Healthy Aging and Mild Cognitive Impairment. In: Meerlo, P., Benca, R. M. and Abel, T. (Eds.), Sleep, Neuronal Plasticity and Brain Function (pp. 307330). Berlin, Heidelberg: Springer Berlin Heidelberg.Google Scholar
Pervin, M., Unno, K., Ohishi, T., Tanabe, H., Miyoshi, N. and Nakamura, Y. (2018). Beneficial effects of green tea catechins on neurodegenerative diseases. Molecules (Basel, Switzerland), 23, 1297. doi: 10.3390/molecules23061297.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Portet, F. et al. (2006). Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in medical practice: a critical review of the concept and new diagnostic procedure. Report of the MCI Working Group of the European Consortium on Alzheimer’s Disease. Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry, 77, 714718. doi: 10.1136/jnnp.2005.085332.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Presečki, P. et al. (2011). Serum lipid levels in patients with Alzheimer’s disease. Collegium Antropologicum, 35, 115120.Google ScholarPubMed
Rauchs, G. et al. (2013). Retrieval of recent autobiographical memories is associated with slow-wave sleep in early AD. Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience, 7, 114–114. doi: 10.3389/fnbeh.2013.00114.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Rolland, Y., Abellan van Kan, G. and Vellas, B. (2008). Physical activity and Alzheimer’s disease: from prevention to therapeutic perspectives. Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, 9, 390405. doi:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jamda.2008.02.007.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Sanchez-Espinosa, M. P., Atienza, M. and Cantero, J. L. (2014). Sleep deficits in mild cognitive impairment are related to increased levels of plasma amyloid-β and cortical thinning. Neuroimage, 98, 395404. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2014.05.027.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Sanford, A. M. (2017). Mild cognitive impairment. Clinics in Geriatric Medicine, 33, 325337. doi: 10.1016/j.cger.2017.02.005.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Schmutte, T., Harris, S., Levin, R., Zweig, R., Katz, M. and Lipton, R. (2007). The relation between cognitive functioning and self-reported sleep complaints in nondemented older adults: results from the Bronx Aging Study. Behavioral Sleep Medicine, 5, 3956. doi: 10.1080/15402000709336725.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Shi, L. et al. (2018). Sleep disturbances increase the risk of dementia: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Sleep Medicine Reviews, 40, 416. doi:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.smrv.2017.06.010.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Spira, A. P. et al. (2013). Self-reported sleep and β-amyloid deposition in community-dwelling older adults. JAMA Neurology, 70, 15371543. doi: 10.1001/jamaneurol.2013.4258.Google ScholarPubMed
Tolppanen, A.-M. et al. (2013). History of medically treated diabetes and risk of Alzheimer Disease in a Nationwide Case-Control Study. Diabetes Care,  7, 20152019. doi: 10.2337/dc12-1287.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tworoger, S. S., Lee, S., Schernhammer, E. S. and Grodstein, F. (2006). The association of self-reported sleep duration, difficulty sleeping, and snoring with cognitive function in older women. Alzheimer Disease & Associated Disorders, 20, 4148. doi: 10.1097/01.wad.0000201850.52707.80.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Wams, E. J., Wilcock, G. K., Foster, R. G. and Wulff, K. (2017). Sleep-Wake Patterns and Cognition of Older Adults with Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment (aMCI): A Comparison with Cognitively Healthy Adults and Moderate Alzheimer’s Disease Patients. Current Alzheimer Research, 14, 10301041. doi: 10.2174/1567205014666170523095634.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Warren, M. W., Hynan, L. S. and Weiner, M. F. (2012). Lipids and adipokines as risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease. Journal of Alzheimers Disease, 29, 151. doi: 10.3233/JAD-2012-111385.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Westerberg, C. E. et al. (2012). Concurrent impairments in sleep and memory in amnestic mild cognitive impairment. Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, 18, 490500. doi: 10.1017/s135561771200001x.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Williams, V. J. et al. (2013). Interindividual variation in serum cholesterol is associated with regional white matter tissue integrity in older adults. Human Brain Mapping, 34, 18261841. doi: 10.1002/hbm.22030.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Xiao, S. et al. (2013). Methodology of China’s national study on the evaluation, early recognition, and treatment of psychological problems in the elderly: the China Longitudinal Aging Study (CLAS). Shanghai Archives of Psychiatry, 25, 9198. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1002-0829.2013.02.005.Google Scholar
Xu, W., Tan, C.-C., Zou, J.-J., Cao, X.-P. and Tan, L. (2020a). Sleep problems and risk of all-cause cognitive decline or dementia: an updated systematic review and meta-analysis. Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, 91, 236244. doi: 10.1136/jnnp-2019-321896.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Xu, W. et al. (2020b). Sleep characteristics and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers of Alzheimer’s disease pathology in cognitively intact older adults: The CABLE study. Alzheimers and Dementia (N Y), 16, 11461152. doi: https://doi.org/10.1002/alz.12117.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Yaffe, K. et al. (2016). Sleep duration and white matter quality in middle-aged adults. Sleep, 39, 17431747. doi: 10.5665/sleep.6104.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Zhang, J. et al. (2020). Association between tea consumption and cognitive impairment in middle-aged and older adults. BMC Geriatrics, 20, 447–447. doi: 10.1186/s12877-020-01848-6.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Supplementary material: File

Yuan et al. supplementary material

Yuan et al. supplementary material

Download Yuan et al. supplementary material(File)
File 16 KB

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Late-life sleep duration associated with amnestic mild cognitive impairment
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Late-life sleep duration associated with amnestic mild cognitive impairment
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Late-life sleep duration associated with amnestic mild cognitive impairment
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *