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Interconnectedness among frailty, sleep, and cognition: recent findings and clinical implications

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 July 2019

Alexandra M. V. Wennberg*
Affiliation:
Department of Neuroscience, University of Padua, Padua, Italy Center for Sleep Medicine, Departments of Neurology and Medicine, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science, Rochester, MN, USA Email: amvwennberg.unipd@gmail.com
Erik K. St. Louis
Affiliation:
Center for Sleep Medicine, Departments of Neurology and Medicine, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science, Rochester, MN, USA Email: amvwennberg.unipd@gmail.com

Abstract

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Type
Commentary
Copyright
© International Psychogeriatric Association 2019 

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References

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