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Healthcare use and costs associated with post-traumatic stress syndrome in a community sample of older adults: results from the ESA-Services study

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 November 2015

Catherine Lamoureux-Lamarche*
Affiliation:
Clinical Sciences Program, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Sherbrooke, Longueuil, QC, Canada Research Center, Charles-Le Moyne Hospital, Longueuil, QC, Canada
Helen-Maria Vasiliadis
Affiliation:
Research Center, Charles-Le Moyne Hospital, Longueuil, QC, Canada Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Sherbrooke, Longueuil, QC, Canada
Michel Préville
Affiliation:
Research Center, Charles-Le Moyne Hospital, Longueuil, QC, Canada Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Sherbrooke, Longueuil, QC, Canada
Djamal Berbiche
Affiliation:
Research Center, Charles-Le Moyne Hospital, Longueuil, QC, Canada
*
Correspondence should be addressed to: Catherine Lamoureux-Lamarche, Master Student in Clinical Sciences, University of Sherbrooke, 150 Place Charles-Le Moyne, Bureau 200, Longueuil, QC, J4 K 0A8, Canada. Phone: +450-466-5433; Fax: +450 670-4135. Email: catherine.lamoureux@usherbrooke.ca.

Abstract

Background:

Studies have shown higher healthcare utilization and costs associated with post-traumatic stress syndrome (PTSS) in veterans and community adult populations. Given the aging population and the impact on health system resources, it is important to understand the economic consequences of PTSS.

Methods:

The data retained came from 1,456 older adults aged 65 years and over recruited in primary medical clinics in the province of Quebec. PTSS was measured with the PTSS scale. Healthcare services (outpatient, emergency department (ED) visits, and inpatient stay) and medication use were captured separately from provincial administrative databases. Healthcare costs incurred in the past year included costs related to outpatient and ED visits, physician fees, inpatient stay, and medication use. Costs were calculated using a healthcare system perspective. χ2 and Mann–Whitney analyses were used to assess healthcare use. Generalized linear models (GLM) with a gamma distribution (Log Link) were used to evaluate the healthcare costs associated with PTSS.

Results:

Results showed a significant difference in the number mental health outpatient visits, the number of total prescriptions and the use (presence of at least one prescription) of antidepressants (ADs) and benzodiazepines (BZDs). The multivariate analyses showed that costs associated with outpatient visits, ED visits, mental health inpatient stays, physician fees, and medication use were significantly associated with the presence of PTSS. The total adjusted healthcare cost difference between groups was significant and reached $838 CAN.

Conclusions:

Respondents with PTSS were more likely to be prescribed psychotropic medications and to have higher ambulatory costs but not inpatient services related costs, more research is required to better understand whether the mental health needs of individuals with a probable PTSS are being met.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © International Psychogeriatric Association 2015 

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