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The association between prostate cancer and mood disorders: a nationwide population-based study in Taiwan

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 October 2014

Pan-Ming Chen
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Yuanshan Branch, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Yilan, Taiwan
San-Chi Chen
Affiliation:
Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan
Chia-Jen Liu
Affiliation:
Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan Institute of Public Health & School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan
Man-Hsin Hung
Affiliation:
Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan
Chia-Fen Tsai
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan
Yu-Wen Hu
Affiliation:
Cancer Center, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan
Mu-Hong Chen
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan
Cheng-Che Shen
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Chiayi Branch, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Chiayi, Taiwan
Tung-Ping Su
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan
Chiu-Mei Yeh
Affiliation:
Department of Family Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan
Ti Lu
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Kaohsiung Veterans General Veterans Hospital, Kaohsiung City, Taiwan
Tzeng-Ji Chen
Affiliation:
School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan Department of Family Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan
Li-Yu Hu*
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Kaohsiung Veterans General Veterans Hospital, Kaohsiung City, Taiwan
*
Correspondence should be addressed to: Li-Yu Hu, M.D. Department of Psychiatry, Kaohsiung Veterans General Veterans Hospital, Taiwan 386, Ta-Chung 1st Rd., Tzuo-Yin Dist., Kaohsiung City 81362, Taiwan. Phone: +886-7-3422121; Fax: +886-7-3468346. Email: chrishuly@gmail.com.

Abstract

Background:

This study identified possible risk factors for newly diagnosed mood disorders, including depressive and bipolar disorders, in prostate cancer patients.

Methods:

From 2000 to 2006, two cohorts were evaluated on the occurrence of mood disorder diagnosis and treatment. For the first cohort, data of patients diagnosed with prostate cancer was obtained from the Taiwan National Health Insurance (NHI) Research Database. As the second cohort, a cancer-free comparison group was matched for age, comorbidities, geographic region, and socioeconomic status.

Results:

Final analyses involved 12,872 men with prostate cancer and 12,872 matched patients. Increased incidence of both depressive (IRR 1.52, 95% CI 1.30–1.79, P <0.001) and bipolar disorder (IRR 1.84, 95% CI 1.25–2.74, P = 0.001) was observed among patients diagnosed with prostate cancer. Multivariate matched regression models show that cerebrovascular disease (CVD) and radiotherapy treatment could be independent risk factors for developing subsequent depressive and bipolar disorders.

Conclusion:

We observed that the risk of developing newly diagnosed depressive and bipolar disorders is higher among Taiwanese prostate cancer patients. Clinicians should be aware of the possibility of increased depressive and bipolar disorders among prostate cancer patients in Taiwan. A prospective study is necessary to confirm these findings.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © International Psychogeriatric Association 2014 

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