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Cost-utility of a cardiovascular prevention program in highly educated adults: Intermediate results of a randomized controlled trial

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  08 January 2010

Nele Jacobs
Affiliation:
Hasselt University
Silvia Evers
Affiliation:
Maastricht University
Andre Ament
Affiliation:
Maastricht University
Neree Claes
Affiliation:
Hasselt University

Abstract

Objectives: Little is known about the costs and the effects of cardiovascular prevention programs targeted at medical and behavioral risk factors. The aim was to evaluate the cost-utility of a cardiovascular prevention program in a general sample of highly educated adults after 1 year of intervention.

Methods: The participants were randomly assigned to intervention (n = 208) and usual care conditions (n = 106). The intervention consisted of medical interventions and optional behavior-change interventions (e.g., a tailored Web site). Cost data were registered from a healthcare perspective, and questionnaires were used to determine effectiveness (e.g., quality-adjusted life-years [QALYs]). A cost-utility analysis and sensitivity analyses using bootstrapping were performed on the intermediate results.

Results: When adjusting for baseline utility differences, the incremental cost was €433 and the incremental effectiveness was 0.016 QALYs. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was €26,910 per QALY.

Conclusions: The intervention was cost-effective compared with usual care in this sample of highly educated adults after 1 year of intervention. Increased participation would make this intervention highly cost-effective.

Type
ASSESSMENTS
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2010

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