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Can Resource Use be Extracted from Randomized Controlled Trials to Calculate Costs?: A Review of Smoking Cessation Interventions in General Practice

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 March 2009

Kathryn Rigby
Affiliation:
Flinders University of South Australia
Christopher Silagy
Affiliation:
Flinders University of South Australia
Alan Crockett
Affiliation:
Flinders Medical Centre

Abstract

The ability to extract information on resource use from randomized controlled trials can provide the groundwork for systematically compiling health economic reviews of health interventions. A review of the brief smoking interventions in general practice demonstrates that not all the necessary information can be extrapolated from these trials, and cost data will have to be supplemented from other sources.

Type
General Essays
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1996

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References

REFERENCES

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