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Compact polarimetry for automotive applications

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2019

Christian Erhart
Affiliation:
University for Applied Science Ulm, 89075 Ulm, Germany
Steffen Lutz
Affiliation:
University for Applied Science Ulm, 89075 Ulm, Germany
Marc A. Mutschler
Affiliation:
University for Applied Science Ulm, 89075 Ulm, Germany
Philipp A. Scharf
Affiliation:
University for Applied Science Ulm, 89075 Ulm, Germany
Thomas Walter
Affiliation:
University for Applied Science Ulm, 89075 Ulm, Germany
Hubert Mantz
Affiliation:
University for Applied Science Ulm, 89075 Ulm, Germany
Robert Weigel
Affiliation:
University of Erlangen-Nürnberg, 91058 Erlangen, Germany
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Though compact polarimetric approaches have been developed and applied in space and geo researching systems they have not been taken into consideration in automotive applications, yet. A sensor system has been designed to conduct polarimetric measurements in the 77 GHz frequency band, which is permitted for automotive usage. This system is able to transceive linearly as well as circularly polarized electromagnetic continuous waves. Depending on the case of application, the frequency output can be set statically or modulated over time within adjustable parameters. Hence, a variety of compact polarimetric modes can be performed and compared with full polarimetric approaches. Two compact polarimetric modes, dual-circular polarimetric mode, and circular-transmit-linear-receive, will be introduced and applied in this contribution. Their operability in this frequency range will be investigated after the microstrip antennas as well as the beam focusing dielectrical lense are characterized. Finally, results of a realistical measurement set-up will confirm the practicability of compact polarimetric approaches for double bounce recognition.

Type
Research Papers
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press and the European Microwave Association 2019 

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