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Hope in Dirt: Report of the Fort Apache Workshop on Forensic Sedimentology Applications to Cultural Property Crime, 15—19 October 2018

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 August 2019

John R. Welch
Affiliation:
Archaeology Southwest and Simon Fraser University; Email: JRWelch@archaeologysouthwest.org
Mark T. Altaha
Affiliation:
White Mountain Apache Tribe
Garry J. Cantley
Affiliation:
US Bureau of Indian Affairs, Western Region Office
William H. Doelle
Affiliation:
Archaeology Southwest
Sarah A. Herr
Affiliation:
Desert Archaeology, Inc.
Morag M. Kersel
Affiliation:
DePaul University
Brandi L. MacDonald
Affiliation:
Archaeometry Laboratory, University of Missouri Research Reactor
Francis P. McManamon
Affiliation:
Center for Digital Antiquity, Arizona State University
Barbara Mills
Affiliation:
University of Arizona
Fred Nials
Affiliation:
Archaeology Southwest
Mary Ownby
Affiliation:
Desert Archaeology, Inc.
Michael Richards
Affiliation:
Simon Fraser University
Ramon Riley
Affiliation:
White Mountain Apache Tribe
Stacy L. Ryan
Affiliation:
Archaeology Southwest
Duston Whiting
Affiliation:
Archaeology Southwest
Donna Yates
Affiliation:
University of Glasgow
Corresponding

Summary:

A 2018 workshop on the White Mountain Apache Tribe lands in Arizona examined ways to enhance investigations into cultural property crime (CPC) through applications of rapidly evolving methods from archaeological science. CPC (also looting, graverobbing) refers to unauthorized damage, removal, or trafficking in materials possessing blends of communal, aesthetic, and scientific values. The Fort Apache workshop integrated four generally partitioned domains of CPC expertise: (1) theories of perpetrators’ motivations and methods; (2) recommended practice in sustaining public and community opposition to CPC; (3) tactics and strategies for documenting, investigating, and prosecuting CPC; and (4) forensic sedimentology—uses of biophysical sciences to link sediments from implicated persons and objects to crime scenes. Forensic sedimentology served as the touchstone for dialogues among experts in criminology, archaeological sciences, law enforcement, and heritage stewardship. Field visits to CPC crime scenes and workshop deliberations identified pathways toward integrating CPC theory and practice with forensic sedimentology’s potent battery of analytic methods.

Type
Conference Report
Copyright
Copyright © International Cultural Property Society 2019 

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Hope in Dirt: Report of the Fort Apache Workshop on Forensic Sedimentology Applications to Cultural Property Crime, 15—19 October 2018
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