Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-78bd46657c-9sqjz Total loading time: 0.247 Render date: 2021-05-08T12:06:52.068Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Trends in Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infections in Adult Intensive Care Units—United States, 1990–2007

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2015

Deron C. Burton
Affiliation:
Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
Jonathan R. Edwards
Affiliation:
Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
Arjun Srinivasan
Affiliation:
Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
Scott K. Fridkin
Affiliation:
Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
Carolyn V. Gould
Affiliation:
Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Background.

Over the past 2 decades, multiple interventions have been developed to prevent catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs). The CAUTI prevention guidelines of the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee were recently revised.

Objective.

To examine changes in rates of CAUTI events in adult intensive care units (ICUs) in the United States from 1990 through 2007.

Methods.

Data were reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) through the National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System from 1990 through 2004 and the National Healthcare Safety Network from 2006 through 2007. Infection preventionists in participating hospitals used standard methods to identify all CAUTI events (categorized as symptomatic urinary tract infection [SUTI] or asymptomatic bacteriuria [ASB]) and urinary catheter–days (UC-days) in months selected for surveillance. Data from all facilities were aggregated to calculate pooled mean annual SUTI and ASB rates (in events per 1,000 UC-days) by ICU type. Poisson regression was used to estimate percent changes in rates over time.

Results.

Overall, 36,282 SUTIs and 22,973 ASB episodes were reported from 367 facilities representing 1,223 adult ICUs, including combined medical/surgical (505), medical (212), surgical (224), coronary (173), and cardiothoracic (109) ICUs. All ICU types experienced significant declines of 19%–67% in SUTI rates and 29%–72% in ASB rates from 1990 through 2007. Between 2000 and 2007, significant reductions in SUTI rates occurred in all ICU types except cardiothoracic ICUs.

Conclusions.

Since 1990, CAUTI rates have declined significantly in all major adult ICU types in facilities reporting to the CDC. Further efforts are needed to assess prevention strategies that might have led to these decreases and to implement new CAUTI prevention guidelines.

Type
Original Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America 2011

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

1.Klevens, RM, Edwards, JR, Richards, CL Jr, et al.Estimating health care-associated infections and deaths in U.S. hospitals, 2002. Public Health Rep 2007;122(2):160166.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
2.Wise, M, Scott, R, Ellingson, K, et al.Burden of major hospital-onset device-associated infection types among adults and children in the United States, 2007. Paper presented at: 21st Annual Scientific Meeting of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America; April 2, 2011; Dallas, Texas. Abstract 3703.Google Scholar
3.Scott, R, Wise, M, Ellingson, K, Baggs, J, Jernigan, J. Economic burden of major device-associated, acute-care hospital-onset infections among adults and children in the United States, 2007. Paper presented at: 21st Annual Scientific Meeting of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America; April 3, 2011; Dallas, Texas. Abstract 4552.Google Scholar
4.Pennsylvania Patient Safety Authority 2009 Annual Report. Harrisburg, PA: Pennsylvania Patient Safety Authority, 2010. http://patientsafetyauthority.org/Documents/Annual_Report_2009.pdf. Accessed November 24, 2010.Google Scholar
5.Weinstein, J, Mazon, D, Pantelick, E, Reagan-Cirincione, P, Dembry, L, Hierholzer, W Jr, A decade of prevalence surveys in a tertiary-care center: trends in nosocomial infection rates, device utilization, and patient acuity. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 1999;20:543548.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
6.Saint, S, Wiese, J, Amory, J, et al.Are physicians aware of which of their patients have indwelling urinary cathters? Am J Med 2000;109:476480.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
7.Richards, M, Edwards, J, Culver, D, Gaynes, R. Nosocomial infections in medical intensive care units in the United States: National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System. Crit Care Med 1999;27:887892.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
8.Cornia, P, Lipsky, B. Indwelling urinary catheters in hospitalized patients: when in doubt, pull it out. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2008;29:820822.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
9.Meddings, J, Rogers, MA, Macy, M, Saint, S. Systematic review and meta-analysis: reminder systems to reduce catheter-associated urinary tract infections and urinary catheter use in hospitalized patients. Clin Infect Dis 2010;51:550560.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
10.Saint, S, Kowalski, C, Forman, J, et al.A multicenter qualitative study on preventing hospital-acquired urinary tract infection in US hospitals. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2008;29:333341.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
11.Gould, C, Umscheid, C, Agarwal, R, Kuntz, G, Pegues, D; Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee. Guideline for prevention of catheter-associated urinary tract infection. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2010;31:319326.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
12.Saint, S, Meddings, JA, Calfee, D, Kowalski, CP, Krein, SL. Catheter-associated urinary tract infection and the Medicare rule changes. Ann Intern Med 2009;150(12):877884.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
13.Umscheid, C, Mitchell, M, Doshi, J, Agarwal, R, Williams, K, Brennan, P. Estimating the proportion of reasonably preventable hospital-acquired infections and associated mortality and costs. Oral presentation at: 19th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America; March 19–22, 2009;San Diego.Google Scholar
14.Reilly, L, Sullivan, P, Ninni, S, Fochesto, D, Williams, K, Fetherman, B. Reducing foley catheter device days in an intensive care unit. AACN Adv Crit Care 2006;17:272283.Google Scholar
15.Topal, J, Conklin, S, Camp, K, Morris, V, Balcezak, T, Herbert, P. Prevention of nosocomial catheter-associated urinary tract infections through computerized feedback to physicians and a nurse-directed protocol. Am J Med Qual 2005;20:121126.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
16.Jain, M, Miller, L, Belt, D, King, D, Berwick, D. Decline in ICU adverse events, nosocomial infections and cost through a quality improvement initiative focusing on teamwork and culture change. Qual Saf Health Care 2006;15:235239.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
17.Burton, DC, Edwards, JR, Horan, TC, Jernigan, JA, Fridkin, SK. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus central line–associated bloodstream infections in US intensive care units, 1997–2007. JAMA 2009;301:727736.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
18.The National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) Manual: Patient Safety Component Protocol. Atlanta: Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, National Center for Preparedness, Detection, and Control of Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2008. http://www.cdc.gov/nhsn/library.html. Accessed December 11, 2009.Google Scholar
19.Horan, TC, Gaynes, R. Surveillance of nosocomial infections. In: Mayhall, CG, ed. Hospital Epidemiology and Infection Control. 3rd ed. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2004:16591702.Google Scholar
20.Horan, T, Andrus, M, Dudeck, M. CDC/NHSN surveillance definition of health care–associated infection and criteria for specific types of infections in the acute care setting. Am J Infect Control 2008;36:309332.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
21.Apisarnthanarak, A, Thongphubeth, K, Sirinvaravong, S, et al.Effectiveness of multifaceted hospitalwide quality improvement programs featuring an intervention to remove unnecessary urinary catheters at a tertiary care center in Thailand. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2007;28:791798.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
22.Misset, B, Timsit, J, Dumay, M, et al.A continuous quality-improvement program reduces nosocomial infection rates in the ICU. Intensive Care Med 2004;30:395400.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
23.Rosenthal, V, Guzman, S, Safdar, N. Effect of education and performance feedback on rates of catheter-associated urinary tract infection in intensive care units in Argentina. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2004;25:4750.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
24.Huang, W-C, Wann, S-R, Lin, S-L, et al.Catheter-associated urinary tract infections in intensive care units can be reduced by prompting physicians to remove unnecessary catheters. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2004;25:974978.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
25.Stéphan, FF, Sax, HH, Wachsmuth, MM, Hoffmeyer, PP, Clergue, FF, Pittet, DD. Reduction of urinary tract infection and antibiotic use after surgery: a controlled, prospective, before-after intervention study. Clin Infect Dis 2006;42:15441551.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
26.Tambyah, P, Maki, D. Catheter-associated urinary tract infection is rarely symptomatic: a prospective study of 1497 catheterized patients. Arch Intern Med 2000;160:678682.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
27.Hooton, T, Bradley, S, Cardenas, D, et al.Diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of catheter-associated urinary tract infection in adults: 2009 International Clinical Practice Guidelines from the Infectious Diseases Society of America. Clin Infect Dis 2010;50:625663.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
28.Gastmeier, P, Geffers, C, Brandt, C, et al.Effectiveness of a nationwide nosocomial infection surveillance system for reducing nosocomial infections. J Hosp Infect 2006;64(1):1622.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
29.Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Reduction in central line-associated bloodstream infections among patients in intensive care units—Pennsylvania, April 2001–March 2005. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2005;54:10131016.Google ScholarPubMed
30.Pronovost, P, Needham, D, Berenholtz, S, et al.An intervention to decrease catheter-related bloodstream infections in the ICU. N Engl J Med 2006;355:27252732.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
31.Richards, C, Emori, TG, Edwards, J, Fridkin, S, Tolson, J, Gaynes, R. Characteristics of hospitals and infection control professionals participating in the National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System 1999. Am J Infect Control 2001;29(6):400403.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Trends in Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infections in Adult Intensive Care Units—United States, 1990–2007
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Trends in Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infections in Adult Intensive Care Units—United States, 1990–2007
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Trends in Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infections in Adult Intensive Care Units—United States, 1990–2007
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *