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Spectrum scores: Toward a better definition of de-escalation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 September 2022

Daniel T. Ilges*
Affiliation:
Mayo Clinic Hospital, Phoenix, Arizona
David J. Ritchie
Affiliation:
Department of Pharmacy, Barnes-Jewish Hospital, St Louis, Missouri
Tamara Krekel
Affiliation:
Department of Pharmacy, Barnes-Jewish Hospital, St Louis, Missouri
Elizabeth A. Neuner
Affiliation:
Department of Pharmacy, Barnes-Jewish Hospital, St Louis, Missouri
Scott T. Micek
Affiliation:
Department of Pharmacy, Barnes-Jewish Hospital, St Louis, Missouri Department of Pharmacy Practice, University of Health Sciences and Pharmacy, St Louis, Missouri
*
Author for correspondence: Daniel T. Ilges, E-mail: ilges.daniel@mayo.edu

Abstract

Spectrum scores measure antimicrobial utilization while also quantifying the spectrum of activity. Accordingly, changes in spectrum score can be used to identify antimicrobial de-escalation. We show that spectrum-score–based de-escalation has a 95.7% positive percentage agreement and 81.6% negative percentage agreement versus de-escalation defined as stopping either antistaphylococcal or antipseudomonal agents.

Type
Concise Communication
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2022. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America

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