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Risk Factors for Central Line–Associated Bloodstream Infection in Pediatric Intensive Care Units

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2015

Matthew C. Wylie*
Affiliation:
Division of Critical Care Medicine, Department of Anesthesia, Children's Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
Dionne A. Graham
Affiliation:
Clinical Research Program, Children's Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts Department of Cardiology, Children's Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
Gail Potter-Bynoe
Affiliation:
Infection Prevention and Control Program, Children's Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
Monica E. Kleinman
Affiliation:
Division of Critical Care Medicine, Department of Anesthesia, Children's Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
Adrienne G. Randolph
Affiliation:
Division of Critical Care Medicine, Department of Anesthesia, Children's Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
John M. Costello
Affiliation:
Department of Cardiology, Children's Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
Thomas J. Sandora
Affiliation:
Infection Prevention and Control Program, Children's Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts Division of Infectious Diseases, Children's Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts Department of Medicine, Children's Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts Department of Laboratory Medicine, Children's Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
*
Division of Critical Care Medicine, Department of Anesthesia, Children's Hospital Boston, 300 Longwood Avenue, Bader 634, Boston, MA 02115, (matthew.wylie@childrens.harvard.edu)

Extract

Objective.

We sought to identify risk factors for central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) to describe children who might benefit from adjunctive interventions.

Design.

Case-control study of children admitted to the medical-surgical intensive care unit (ICU) or cardiac ICU from January 1, 2004, through December 31, 2007.

Setting.

Children's Hospital Boston is a freestanding, 396-bed quaternary care pediatric hospital with a 29-bed medical-surgical ICU and a 24-bed cardiac ICU.

Patients.

Case patients were patients with CLABSI who were identified by means of prospective surveillance. Control subjects were patients with a central venous catheter who were matched by ICU admission date.

Methods.

Multivariate conditional logistic regression models were used to identify independent risk factors for CLABSI and to derive and to validate a prediction rule.

Results.

Two hundred three case patients were matched with 406 control subjects. Independent predictors of CLABSI included duration of ICU central access (odds ratio [OR] for 15 or more days, 18.41 [95% confidence interval {CI} 4.10-82.56]; P < .001), central venous catheter placement in the ICU (OR for 2 or more ICU-placed catheters, 8.63 [95% CI, 2.63-28.38]; P = .001), nonoperative cardiovascular disease (OR, 7.44 [95% CI, 2.13-25.98]; P = .012), presence of gastrostomy tube (OR, 3.48 [95% CI, 1.55-7.79]; P = .003), receipt of parenteral nutrition (OR, 3.12 [95% CI, 1.55-6.32]; P= .002), and receipt of blood transfusion (OR, 2.55 [95% CI, 1.21-5.36]; P = .014). By use of risk factors known before central venous catheter placement, our model predicted CLABSI with a positive predictive value of 54% and a negative predictive value of 79%.

Conclusions.

Duration of central access, receipt of parenteral nutrition, and receipt of blood transfusion were confirmed as risk factors for CLABSI among children in the ICU. Newly identified risk factors include presence of gastrostomy tube, nonoperative cardiovascular disease, and ICU placement of central venous catheter. Children with these risk factors may be candidates for adjunctive interventions for CLABSI prevention.

Type
Original Articles
Copyright
Copyright © The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America 2010

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