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Product Commentary: Waterless Agents for Decontaminating the Hands

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2015

Charles W. Stratton
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical Microbiology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee

Abstract

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Type
Special Sections
Copyright
Copyright © The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America 1986

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References

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11.Ojajarvi, J.Makela, P, Rantasalo, I, Failure of hand disinfection with frequent handwashing: A need for prolonged field studies. J Hyg Camb 1977;79:107119.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
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