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Nosocomial Rotavirus in a Pediatric Hospital

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2015

Adam J. Ratner
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatrics, Babies & Children's Hospital of New York, New York-Presbyterian Medical Center, Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York City, New York
Natalie Neu
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatrics, Babies & Children's Hospital of New York, New York-Presbyterian Medical Center, Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York City, New York
Kathleen Jakob
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Epidemiology, Babies & Children's Hospital of New York, New York-Presbyterian Medical Center, Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York City, New York
Surah Grumet
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatrics, Babies & Children's Hospital of New York, New York-Presbyterian Medical Center, Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York City, New York
Nora Adachi
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Epidemiology, Babies & Children's Hospital of New York, New York-Presbyterian Medical Center, Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York City, New York
Phyllis Della-Latta
Affiliation:
Department of Pathology, Babies & Children's Hospital of New York, New York-Presbyterian Medical Center, Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York City, New York
Edith Marvel
Affiliation:
Occupational Health Service, Babies & Children's Hospital of New York, New York-Presbyterian Medical Center, Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York City, New York
Lisa Saiman*
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatrics, Babies & Children's Hospital of New York, New York-Presbyterian Medical Center, Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York City, New York Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Epidemiology, Babies & Children's Hospital of New York, New York-Presbyterian Medical Center, Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York City, New York
*
Columbia University, Department of Pediatrics, 650 W 168th St, PH4 W-Room 470, New York, NY 10032

Abstract

We describe a nosocomial rotavirus outbreak among pediatric cardiology patients and the impact of a prospective, laboratory-based surveillance program for rotavirus in our university-affiliated, quartenary-care pediatric hospital in New York City. Improved compliance with infection control and case-finding among patients and healthcare workers halted the outbreak.

Type
Concise Communication
Copyright
Copyright © The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America 2001

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References

1.Mitchell, DK, Pickering, LK. Nosocomial gastrointestinal tract infections in pediatric patients. In: Mayhall, CG, ed. Hospital Epidemiology and Infection Control. Baltimore, MD: Williams & Wilkins; 1996:506523.Google ScholarPubMed
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