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Lack of Significant Variability among Different Methods for Calculating Antimicrobial Days of Therapy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2015

Christine J. Kubin*
Affiliation:
Department of Pharmacy, NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital and Department of Medicine, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, New York
Haomiao Jia
Affiliation:
Department of Biostatistics, Mailman School of Public Health and School of Nursing, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, New York
Luis R. Alba
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatrics, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, New York
E. Yoko Furuya
Affiliation:
Infection Prevention and Control, NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital and Department of Medicine, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, New York
*
630 West 168th Street, Box 82, Division of Infectious Diseases, New York, NY 10032 (cck27@columbia.edu)

Abstract

Days of therapy (DOTs) are an important measure to quantify antimicrobial use but may not reflect patients' true antimicrobial exposure. Three methods of calculating DOTs were compared to determine whether including “exposure days,” when antimicrobials are given less frequently than daily due to renal dysfunction, makes a difference.

Type
Concise Communication
Copyright
Copyright © The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America 2012

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References

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