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Influence of State Laws Mandating Reporting of Healthcare-Associated Infections: The Case of Central Line–Associated Bloodstream Infections

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2015

Amy L. Pakyz
Affiliation:
Department of Pharmacotherapy and Outcomes Science, School of Pharmacy, Virginia Commonwealth University, Medical College of Virginia Campus, Richmond, Virginia
Michael B. Edmond
Affiliation:
Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University, Medical College of Virginia Campus, Richmond, Virginia
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Objective.

To evaluate the impact of state laws on reporting of healthcare-associated infections on central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) rates.

Design.

Retrospective, cross-sectional study.

Methods.

Hospital-level administrative and Hospital Compare data were collected on University HealthSystem Consortium hospitals. An ordered probit regression model assessed the association between state legislation and CLABSI standardized infection ratio (SIR). The main independent variable was a state legislation variable concerning 3 legal requirements (data submission, reporting of data to the public, inclusion of facility identifiers in public reports) and was coded for hospitals accordingly located in a state that did not have CLABSI reporting, located in a state that had CLABSI reporting legislation and met 3 legal requirements, or located in a state that had CLABSI reporting but did not meet the 3 legal requirements. A secondary analysis ascertained whether the mean state SIR values differed among the 3 legislation groups.

Results.

There were 159 hospitals included; 92 were located in states that had CLABSI reporting and met 3 requirements, 33 were located in states that had reporting but did not meet the 3 requirements, and 34 were in states that had no legislation. There was no effect of state legislation group on CLABSI SIR. There were no significant differences in the mean state CLABSI SIRs among the legislation groups.

Conclusions.

In this sample of academic medical centers, there was no evidence of an effect of state HAI laws on CLABSI occurrence. The impact of state legislation may be lessened by other CLABSI prevention initiatives.

Type
Original Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America 2013

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References

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