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Infection Control in Switzerland

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2015

Didier Pittet*
Affiliation:
Infection Control Programs of the University Hospitals of Geneva, Switzerland
Patrick Francioli
Affiliation:
Lausanne, Switzerland
Jan von Overbeck
Affiliation:
Bern, Switzerland
Pierre-Alain Raeber
Affiliation:
Swiss Federal Office of Public Health, Switzerland
Christian Ruef
Affiliation:
Zurich, Switzerland
Andreas F. Widmer
Affiliation:
Basel, Switzerland
*
Infection Control Program, Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medecine, Geneva University Hospital, 24, rue Micheli-du-Crest 1211 Geneva 14, Switzerland

Abstract

Infection control in hospitals is not mandatory in Switzerland as in the United States. There are more than 300 acute-care hospitals in Switzerland. Hospitals are reimbursed by patient-days rather than diagnosis-related group. However, all five Swiss university hospitals have developed an infection control program. The major criteria for setting up and running these programs are reviewed; data are based on a questionnaire and personal interviewing of each institution. Most of the major criteria exist in all five institutions. Resources allocated to infection control differ markedly. The number of infection control nurses per 250 beds varies between 0.2 and 0.75 for the five hospitals; the activity of those in charge of infection control differs between hospitals. A comparison is made between the Swiss and U.S. programs with regard to some aspects of healthcare and infection control.

Type
Global Infection Control
Copyright
Copyright © The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America 1995

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