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Genotypic Analysis by 27A DNA Fingerprinting of Candida albicans Strains Isolated During an Outbreak in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2015

Stefania Boccia
Affiliation:
Institute of Microbiology, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy
Brunella Posteraro*
Affiliation:
Institute of Microbiology, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy
Marilena La Sorda
Affiliation:
Institute of Microbiology, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy
Giovanni Vento
Affiliation:
Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy
Piero Giuseppe Matassa
Affiliation:
Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy
Alessia Tempera
Affiliation:
Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy
Stefano Petrucci
Affiliation:
Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy
Giovanni Fadda
Affiliation:
Institute of Microbiology, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy
*
Institute of Microbiology, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, L. go F. Vito, 1-00168 Rome, Italy

Abstract

We describe an outbreak of Candida albicans systemic infection involving five premature infants in a neonatal intensive care unit. Molecular and epidemiologic characterization of all C. albicans isolates was performed by DNA fingerprinting with the 27A probe. This genotypic analysis demonstrated that the isolates were identical, providing evidence for the circulation of a unique C. albicans strain.

Type
Concise Communications
Copyright
Copyright © The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America 2002

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References

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Genotypic Analysis by 27A DNA Fingerprinting of Candida albicans Strains Isolated During an Outbreak in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit
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Genotypic Analysis by 27A DNA Fingerprinting of Candida albicans Strains Isolated During an Outbreak in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit
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