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Electronic Mail An Imperative for Healthcare Epidemiologists

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2015

John A. Sellick Jr
Affiliation:
Department of Medicine, Buffalo General Hospital, Buffalo, New York

Abstract

Electronic mail (e-mail) offers the potential for near-instantaneous transfer of messages and files across thousands of miles. The same message can be sent simultaneously to multiple recipients and for warded without retyping. Messages can be sent or read at any time, eliminating “telephone tag,” and, because the system is paperless, lost, blurred, and incomplete, facsimile transmissions can be minimized. Additionally, e-mail is less expensive than overnight letter ser vices or long-distance faxes. All healthcare epidemiologists should enter the information superhighway using e-mail. This article provides basic information needed to understand and begin using e-mail.

Type
Information Management
Copyright
Copyright © The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America 1997

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References

1.McFedries, P. The Complete Idiot's Guide to Internet E-Mail. Indianapolis, IN: Que Corp; 1995.Google Scholar
2.Levine, JR, Baroudi, C, Young, ML, Reinhold, A. Internet E-mail for Dummies. Foster City, CA: IDG Books Worldwide; 1996.Google Scholar
3.Kawasaki, G. The rules of e-mail. Macworld 1995;12(10):286.Google Scholar
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