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Comparison of nylon-flocked swab and cellulose sponge methods for carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae and gram-negative organism recovery from high-touch surfaces in patient rooms

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 August 2018

Clare Rock*
Affiliation:
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland Johns Hopkins Medicine Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality, Baltimore, Maryland Department of Hospital Epidemiology and Infection Control, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland
Michael Anderson
Affiliation:
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
Shawna Lewis
Affiliation:
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
Verna Scheeler
Affiliation:
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
Elaine Nowakowski
Affiliation:
Department of Hospital Epidemiology and Infection Control, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland
Yea-Jen Hsu
Affiliation:
Health Policy and Management, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland
Aaron M. Milstone
Affiliation:
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland Johns Hopkins Medicine Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality, Baltimore, Maryland Department of Hospital Epidemiology and Infection Control, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland
Karen C. Carroll
Affiliation:
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
Lisa L. Maragakis
Affiliation:
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland Johns Hopkins Medicine Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality, Baltimore, Maryland Department of Hospital Epidemiology and Infection Control, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland
Patricia J. Simner
Affiliation:
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
for the CDC Prevention Epicenters Program
Affiliation:
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland Johns Hopkins Medicine Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality, Baltimore, Maryland Department of Hospital Epidemiology and Infection Control, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland Health Policy and Management, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland
*
Author for correspondence: Clare Rock, MD, MS, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, 600 North Wolfe Street, Halsted 831, Baltimore, MD 21287-5425. E-mail: Clare.Rock@jhmi.edu.

Abstract

The ideal sampling method and benefit of qualitative versus quantitative culture for carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) recovery in hospitalized patient rooms and bathrooms is unknown. Although the use of nylon-flocked swabs improved overall gram-negative organism recovery compared with cellulose sponges, they were similar for CRE recovery. Quantitative culture was inferior and unrevealing beyond the qualitative results.

Type
Concise Communication
Copyright
© 2018 by The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. All rights reserved 

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